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  1. #1
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    Russian 22 sec. fuze

    Hi,
    I am looking for some info on the 22 sec fuze on the right side of the picture.
    Both fuzes were manufactured by STZ (CT3) in 1916.
    The fuze on the right has brass body, which is a little shorter. It makes the overall length of the fuze shorter.
    It has the designation 60 in the circle on the rings.

    Thanks, Bob
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    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

  2. #2
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    Hello Bob. Do you have a copy of the 1913 dated Russian ammunition manual for the 3 inch cannons? There are some drawings and text on this fuse. I can read very little of it.

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    Nabob (5th April 2019)

  4. #3
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    Hi,
    I do not think I have the doc you are refering to.
    I have got some pictures of the brass body fuzes from the web. Some of them have even numbers on the rings in nearly the same position. The numbers are not in the circle. There was a theory raised, that the number could refer to the powder used in the ring.

    I also do not have any other 22 sec fuzes to compare the manufacture years in Samarsky Trubocny Zavod (STZ) to see if 1916 was the year they changed the material of the body from brass to aluminium.

    There is one more question about this fuze that my hungarian friends can answer (please see pic) and help me with the translation. There seems to be a variant where the impact mechanism is removed and replaced with powder. All I have is this picture but no description (my hungarian is non existing so it would not help much anyway :-))

    Cheers, Bob
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    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

  5. #4
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    Hi,

    Double action fuze called "D" ? (I don't speak russian) (sorry for the crappy scan, not my work)

    Image6.jpg Image7.jpg

    Regards,

    S.
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  6. #5
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    Here is what is in the 1913 manual on the fuse:
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Nabob (6th April 2019)

  8. #6
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    Thank You,
    @sgdbdr - I am 100% sure it is a 22 sek fuze. The fuze D (Dmitrieva) has a little different shape. It can be sometines hard to distinguish if you cannot compare the two, but the main clue is the hole for the automatic fuze setter on the D fuze (right of the UD mark)

    @M8owner - if my russian is correct the text says that the main parts of the fuze are manufactured of alluminium. That is interesting to read in a 1913 document. It canceles ma theory of transition from brass to alluminium.

    I forgot to mention that both fuzes are P models.

    Bob
    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

  9. #7
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    The drawing in the 1913 manual also shows the top piece and the base are made from two different materials via the different shading/cross hatching. The manual also has a drawing of a 30 second fuse that is similar but has a different top part.

  10. #8
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    I have see anothes aluminium fuze manufactured in Samara in 1915.
    On another forum I got info on 1917 STZ PG model fuze.

    The 30 sec fuzes are also manufactured from different materials, but they have different designation. Attached are the pics from Rdultovskys book.

    Bob
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    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

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    Which book is the Rdultovskys book?
    I've never heard of that one before.

    Joe

  12. #10
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    В. И. РДУЛТОВСКИЙ
    ИСТОРИЧЕСКИЙ ОЧЕРК РАЗВИТИЯ ТРУБОК И ВЗРЫВАТЕЛЕЙ ОТ НАЧАЛА ИХ
    ПРИМЕНЕНИЯ ДО КОНЦА МИРОВОЙ ВОЙНЫ 1914-1918 гг.
    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

 

 
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