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    ID on MkVll projectiles.

    Hi all, help needed with ID on a MkVll.3 cordite 1 nitro. All WW1. LtoR. J Birmingham metals &munitions(F Joyce co). DF dumdum arsenal Calcutta. RL Woolwich.RLWoolwich. Can't work out why the extra cannula.any help would appreciate. Shawy.
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    Hi Shawy,

    The extra cannelure was usually put on in case it was necessary to use a mouth crimp, rather than the more usual "slit" crimps on the neck. Over the years, I have seen quite a few .303" bullets from the WW1 period like that.

    Roger.

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    Shawy (22nd March 2019)

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    Thanks Roger. Only problem is-I don't think they used neck crimps in WWl except on special ammunition. I've trawled T Edwards books and various notes and papers I've got but with no luck. Thanks for the input though, it's a possibility. Regards Pete.

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    As far as I recall, the rounds supplied to us on contract by the Americans had mouth coning. It may be that is the wrong bullet for that case. When they get inerted, some dealers are not too careful about putting the right bullet in the right case!
    R.

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    Hi Shawy,
    I agree with Roger on this - the US contract .303s during the Great War used mouth crimping, as their manufacturing equipment could not perform the indent crimp. They used the same .303 bullet otherwise, (with the original lower cannelure still present) but added the higher and thinner one. I can't quite make out the stamp on the base of the bullet. Four companies made these: Winchester Repeating Arms, Remington Arms, Peters and US Cartridge Company. The stamp on your bullet might correspond with one of those. As Roger suggests, it might be the bullet and case have got mixed up in the process of making it inert.

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    Shawy (25th March 2019)

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    Hi roger, just to help clear things up a bit. The round in question is not a contact rnd,it was manufactured by royal laboratory in 1917 and WAS nitro filled, it has only been pulled for ID. ALL my collection is covered by a FAC. The stamp on the base is I'm afraid unreadable but I suspect it is a circle the same as the other R/L rnd in the photo. The length and weight are correct apart from a few grains +\- . and all are nonmagnetic. Without sectioning it I won't know and I'm not prepared to do that. Once again thanks for your input. I'll put some photos of US contract .303 up later. Regards Pete.

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    Pete,
    Thanks for the extra information. Seeing as you can vouch for the connection between the case and the bullet, this makes it quite an interesting round. The evidence would suggest that it is a US made bullet, but with the case being filled and completed at Royal Laboratory. While cases were filled at locations different from manufacture in the UK, I don't know if this occurred with component parts from US factories and UK filling stations. Perhaps there is another reason.
    Here is a photo of one of my double cannelured bullets (fired), found near Thiepval Wood.
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    Shawy (25th March 2019)

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    Hi Justin,thanks for the imput,I've also got the same rnd. Trouble is its 1.2830in the Brit rnd is 1.2600, not sure why. I'll put some photos up soon. I don't think US rnds were used as separates in Brit munitions factories we supplied our own components to our own factories as far as I know. The rnd and case were made at GCF3 Blackpole Worcestershire. I've just had the rnd under a scope and it's possiblely got a P on it I'm not sure. Think this is one for litriture boys, if they used contract projectiles in home cases then that's my answer if not then I'm stumped. Regards Pete.

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    The only double cannelured .303" bullets I have seen were from tracer rounds.
    They were double cannelured to reduce moisture penetration, the cases being cannelured into both cannelures or the bottom one was cannelured and multiple crimps were used on the top one.
    The cannelures also hold beeswax or lanolin which was originally for lubrication but was found also to aid waterproofing.

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    AE501,I think this is one for the guys who have access to official documents and such. I tend to side with Justin on this I've compaired it to the others in the photo and it may be a US contract,need one of the document guys to confirm it. I've also seen the cannelures on tracers AE501. The crimps were pin crimps though,still double cannelures just pinned instead of crimped. Interesting. Regards Pete.

 

 
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