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  1. #11
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    Thank you so much for those papers Bonnex. Some fabulous details in there.


    Looking at Kinematograph Engineering brought me back to Milton's "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Conduct", which I think has Macrae's, "Winston Churchill's Toyshop" as its source for this section (can't find my copy right now to check)
    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...2%20Co&f=false


    So KE for Kinematograph Engineering seems certain from both sources (also Boon & Porter).


    Lang Pen seems likely for LP. They also made Pen daggers for SOE, and a built whole new factory at Abergavenny to make radiators for aircraft which opened in 1943.


    Franco Signs were clearly involved, but not sure this links to ESS (and have checked - definitely E.S.S. and not F.S.S.which might misread as ESS). ESS signs seem to have struggled with the L Delay, but thought about doing a fuse igniter, which isn't too far from a pull or pressure switch. They are obviously a strong candidate though the Birmingham ESS (Edwin Showell & Sons) is too. ESS Signs appear on a list of Lee Enfield Manufacturer codes, and their factory at Bristol did Air Ministry work for sure. They were a founder member of BEMA set up during the war. They had a lot of locations so most have been a sizeable concern. Neon signs appear to have been a core business.


    What is interesting is the 1941 order for cardboard boxes for the L Delay, suggesting the lack of tins dated pre-1942 is because they weren't packed in tins, but in cardboard boxes. The cellophane is most likely for the individual device wrappings. Though possibly to cover the cardboard boxes? Nice to see the receipt for the small instruction book inserts too.


    The L Delay boxes I have images of were all marked MD1 or MD1(W) as manufacturer, despite all these orders to other firms! Dates ranging 1943-45. So none tie up with these orders, but perhaps others have seen tins that do.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to CartDorset For This Useful Post:

    Bonnex (27th April 2019)

  3. #12
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    IF, I recall correctly, the presence of MD1 on a store was in effect an acceptance stamp. They, MD1, wanted to avoid what they considered the bureaucracy of the MoS Inspection system and inspected stores themselves.

    TimG

  4. #13
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    Cardboard boxes were used for packing L delays. The boxes were about 4-in x 4.75-in x 1-in and made of a purple coloured board. A hinged lid was printed with instructions for use on its underside. The body of the box was fitted out with corrugated card and a hinged closing piece, also fitted with corrugated card, held the L Delays in place when the box was closed. A loop of elastic, fixed to the base, served to hold the box closed. Ten L Delays, each wrapped in Cellophane, could be accommodated in the box. A paper label on the end of the lid indicated the contents; a date stamp was put on to the label or just below the instructions in the lid. The date on the example is 17 Nov 1941.

    The two aluminium tubes shown in the photograph are sleeves to allow safety fuze to be crimped to the device - the spring clip 'snout' version of the L Delay dispensed with the need for the sleeves.


    L Delay boxes3.JPG
    N.


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    Anders (30th April 2019), CartDorset (27th April 2019), switch (27th April 2019)

  6. #14
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    Thank you for posting the image of the cardboard L Delay box. This certainly explains the lack of earlier dates on the tins. In the absence of of the real thing, I made a replica tin and contents for display. The tin is a bit too long as based on an old cigarette tin. I copied the label inside the lid from a friends box. I made the L Delays as the earlier version as the spring snouts are tricky to do. Since the correspondence posted above includes a letter mentioning earlier spring snout orders in June 1942, suggests that only the later version would appear in a tin. I now see I probably need to make a replica cardboard box with a revised lid label! It would be helpful to know how long the aluminium sleeves are - they look about the size of a No.8 Det. These are easy enough to replicate.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by CartDorset; 28th April 2019 at 09:18 PM.

  7. #15
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    Al sleeve is 26.72mm (long), 6.33mm (external diam), 5.7mm (Int Diam)

    If you PM an email address I will send a scan of the labels on the cardboard box.

    One official description of the L Delay includes a note which says 'early issues were in cardboard boxes'.
    N.


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    Anders (30th April 2019)

 

 
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