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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by spotter View Post
    i can see grooves in the photo

    Attachment 155916
    Yes but they should go at least on segment higher than that.
    William Mills - Thank you!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by siegfreid View Post
    British designed !
    It had various guises. In the Canadian Patent it even had the muzzle clip we know from the No 3. There was also a drawing of it with the vane, like a No 3 or 4.
    William Mills - Thank you!

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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millsman View Post
    Yes but they should go at least on segment higher than that.
    Have you got a pic of one you can show us, John?

    Most seem to have the top two rings devoid of vertical grooves.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millsman View Post
    Design stolen after the 1911 trials at Spandau no less.
    Except that the Germans did (arguably with very good reason) replace the safety/arming mechanism with their own completely different design using a black powder pellet, as in the drawing in post #2.

    Hale's design used his needle pellet restraining bolts, as shown in his 1911 patent.


    .
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  8. #15
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    Tom

    I've seen a few were the vertical grooves extend into the lower 2nd segment.

    Here's one I have at the moment, which is a minor intrusion but I have seen others where it does extend much further. Considering the number of different machinists, factories in Germany variances from the pattern will occur, as with the Mills transverse castings. - John


    SSCN3071.JPG
    William Mills - Thank you!

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  10. #16
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    OK thanks, John. That one is basically as shown by Doctor in post #8.


    Tom.

  11. #17
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    I've probably had about 30 of these pass through my hands in the last 10 years and I'd say between 6 and 8 had shown vertical grooves extending into the 2nd top segment. It looks like the vertical groves were cut with a milling machine and how deep or how long they were depended on the individual operator. I suspect there were rules but when you are turning them out in their thousands there will always be variations. The M1914 is far less likely to have this as the top segment unscrewed and was unlikely to have been machined.
    William Mills - Thank you!

  12. #18
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    No turning machine used on these two grenades IMG_0014.jpgIMG_0015.jpgIMG_0013.jpgfrom casting foundry (see the tracing molding on)

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  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millsman View Post
    It looks like the vertical groves were cut with a milling machine and how deep or how long they were depended on the individual operator.
    As Doctor says, there is no need for the use of a lathe, and definitely not a miller - even if the serrations extended further up. The castings are standard longitudinal castings - the flattened serrations can be seen either side of the mould line.

  15. #20
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    mvc-096s.jpgmvc-097s.jpg
    This is probably either one of the Hales made examples or an Austrian copy . I've actually no idea whatsoever . None of its parts will fit a German production model . I don't suppose this will help this thread at all . No markings before anyone asks .

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