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  1. #1
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    Lead seal/jointing on 60 Pdr shrapnel ogive

    Good evening,

    Would anyone know the process used for applying the Lead seal/joint on 60 Pdr shrapnel shells, between the body and ogive, during the First War?

    I'm assuming the Lead was turned to profile on a lathe after having been applied but how was it actually fixed to the shell? Lead strip hammered into place?
    Lead bar stock gently heated and applied with a dabbing motion to build it up?

    Any info would be greatly appreciated.

    Many thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    The drawing refers to it as 'solder' I would imagine a similar process to 'wiped joints' (plumbing).

    TimG

  3. #3
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    Sure it is pure lead and not lead-tin? The documents call it "solder". Because of it's function as a washer I think soldering is the only way. And I guess it also must have been so tightly fixed that it couldn't fall apart when firing. Otherwise it could cause bad accidents.

  4. #4
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    I thought the joints were silver soldered. 15 pounders I have with the brass fuze socket soldered to the ogive are soldered with a material much harder than soft lead solder.

  5. #5
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    Many thanks for the replies TimG and Alpini,

    It hadn't crossed my mind that it could be Solder. Any ideas as to how it would have been applied? I'm guessing a bar of Lead-tin solder heated and dabbed onto the join to build it up then turned on a lathe to profile?
    Cheers.

  6. #6
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    See here -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzyVH0NAHbQ (4mins onwards)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZH1tA3i6bY

    Somewhere out there, there is an excellent film by the GPO on jointing big telephone cables, can't find it at the moment..

    The areas you don't want solder are painted with 'plumbers' black'. If one had a template with an internal radius of 9.92", you could make the final wipe with that and there would be no need for turning.

    TimG

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to TimG For This Useful Post:

    AE501 (16th October 2019)

  8. #7
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    Two fascinating videos I had to see to believe it could be done. Thanks.

  9. #8
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    Many thanks TimG,

    I'm with ron3350 on that one. Excellent clips indeed. And made to look so easy. Not sure if the wife would tolerate a hot cauldron of molten Solder in the front room, or using her soup ladles, oven gloves, etc, but maybe she'd respect the authenticity of the project and even encourage it? ....( As I'm picking out the Solder spatter from the singed carpet.....)

    But a great reference and certainly food for thought. I'll look into this further and try a few test runs first on a mock up.
    Many thanks to all for the input.
    Cheers.

  10. #9
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    Starshell,

    As you're in the South, you could pay Amberley Museum https://www.amberleymuseum.co.uk/discover a visit. One of the many crafts displayed is plumbing, by the Worshipful Company of Plumbers www.amberleymuseum.co.uk/worshipful-company-of-plumbers It's traditional plumbing, no 15mm pipe or compression fittings. The staff are very approachable and I think would be very willing to advise you. The last time I was there, they were casting parts for decorative lead guttering and welding (their term) the parts together. They are in regular, but not in permanent attendance, so 'phone ahead. The museum is well worth a visit.

    TimG
    Last edited by TimG; 16th October 2019 at 12:20 AM.

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    AE501 (16th October 2019), ydnum303 (16th October 2019)

  12. #10
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    Aren't there are any examples with original solder known?

 

 
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