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    122mm Shell Hollow Charge

    Hi, I have this 122mm projo and I would like more info on it. Exact type, use, kind of gun, era, manufacturer, meaning of the markings etc... My understanding is the 122mm is a howitzer, however it seems rather unusual to fire such a projectile in a howitzer? Any input will be greatly appreciated.

    Image (90).jpgImage (89).jpgImage (97).jpgImage (92).jpgImage (91).jpgImage (96).jpgImage (94).jpgImage (95).jpgImage - 2020-03-31T222754.971.jpgImage (98).jpgImage - 2020-03-31T224723.510.jpg

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    I show it to be a BK-13 for the D-30.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/122_mm...2_mm_BK_13.jpg

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  5. #3
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    The BK-13M is relatively modern projectile, in use with D-30 towed and 2S1 self-propelled howitzers.
    First Czech range tables that show the model BK-13 (and that I have seen) are from 1981. In USSR they could have it much earlier.
    I am not sure what is the difference between BK-13 and BK-13M.
    There is an interesting remark in one of the docs: The projectile filled with A-IX-1, when loaded to a hot barrel, is to be fired within 3 minutes due to the cook-off danger.

    It makes perfect sense to use HEAT projectile for howitzers. The Miznay-Chardin effect is not dependable on the velocity of the projectile, i.e. it makes no significant difference in penetration if the projo moves 800 m/s or is stationary.
    Introducing HEAT rounds during WW2 gave the low velocity howitzers a good anti-tank capability.

    Markings:
    ZP - manufacturers code
    2-87 - lot and year of manufacture
    122 - caliber
    -- - weight group


    A-IX-1 - (A-9-1) - explosive
    BK-13M - projectile type
    V-15 - fuze type

    The V-15 fuze has two part. Visible is the V-15PG made by ZID (Zavod imeni Degtaryeva in Kovrov) lot 17-86.

    Bob
    Last edited by Nabob; 1st April 2020 at 11:56 AM.
    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nabob View Post
    I am not sure what is the difference between BK-13 and BK-13M.
    3BK13M has copper cone instead of steel.

    Vince

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    According to Russian Arms Forum 3BK-13 shell, part of 3VBK-9 round, was introduced in 1975. It is standard shaped charge, it does not use Misznay-Schardin effect, which Explosively Formed Projectiles are based on.

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    Yes,
    thank you for the correction, that would be the Munroe or Neumann effect for HEAT, I mixed it up.
    Bob
    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nabob View Post
    Yes,
    thank you for the correction, that would be the Munroe or Neumann effect for HEAT, I mixed it up.
    Bob
    Best just to say the shaped charge effect, and not worry about who did or didn't discover it (all too nationalistic for my liking and who exactly found it first is open to question).

    If you want to be more specific, say what type of shaped charge it is, or what the profile of the liner is. If it's the same as the BK-13, then the BK-13M has a varying thickness (thinner at the base, thicker at the top) conical copper shaped charge liner.

    BK-13 - US DoD.jpg

    Fuzing is the V-15 (В-15), comprised of the V-15PG (В-15ПГ) nose element and the V-15DU (В-15ДУ) base element.

    V-15.png

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    Thanks a lot all of you for your input, that's exactly what I wanted to know. A few more questions though:
    1/ What does the case look like, dimensions?
    2/ I assume, although the gun is a howitzer, it can be used as a field gun to aim direct shots at a more or less moving target, hence the need for such a shell?
    3/ And last but not least, is it a rare round?
    Thanks
    Last edited by doppz92; 1st April 2020 at 08:15 PM.

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    Russian D-30 ammo chart attached. Of course, the BK-13 is too new for this old chart. I have never seen this round for sale in the US. So, over here, you could probably get $200-$400 for it. I do not know its value in the UK. You could tear that down and ship it to the US with great ease - hint, hint.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by M8owner; 1st April 2020 at 10:12 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doppz92 View Post
    Thanks a lot all of you for your input, that's exactly what I wanted to know. A few more questions though:
    1/ What does the case look like, dimensions?
    2/ I assume, although the gun is a howitzer, it can be used as a field gun to aim direct shots at a more or less moving target, hence the need for such a shell?
    3/ And last but not least, is it a rare round?
    Thanks


    It uses the 4Zh9 charge system that is comprised of the 4B10 full charge and the 4G5 zinc (I think) plated steel cartridge case that has a primer in its base, such as the KV-4. The charge contains about 3.8 kg of single-base propellant (two types, 12/1 Tr and 12/7), plus a fast-burning single base propellant (VTX-10) with a flash reducer, and finally a black powder igniter charge.

    It may also be found with the 4G5-1 case with its improved obturation system (the three grooves partway down the case). Images below show the Bulgarian version of the round and the 4G5-1 case. The charges are marked up as J-9-1, which is a very weird transliteration of 4Zh9-1 (4Ж9-1).

    122-NON-SPINNING-PROJECTILE.jpg

    4Zh9-1.jpg

    It’s used by the D-30 towed howitzer (2A18 gun) and the 2S1 Gvozdika self-propelled howitzer (2A31 gun), or other systems based on those two systems (guns). I would imagine it’s a secondary, or even tertiary round that is really only used for anti-armour use. Penetration is often quoted to be around 400 mm of RHA, so useless against the frontal armour of modern main battle tanks, but fine against other MBT non-reactive armour protective areas, along with more lightly-protected armoured vehicles and other hard battlefield targets. Its piezo fuze and thickish case means fast action on impact and considerable fragmentation, so it could be used against soft targets.

    As to how common it is, I checked an old (1980) Russian 2S1 manual for the standard load-out. The standard load-out is 40 projectiles, of which 35 were 3OF462 series HE-frag, and five where 3BK13 anti-armour. The 3BK13 were placed at the right rear (when viewed from behind) of the turret bustle. I would imagine, from an operational, logistical and historical point of view, the 3BK13 and later 3BK13M were uncommon, just not nearly as common as HE-frag. I haven't gone through the D-30 manuals, so I don't know how commonly an issued nature it was for those guns.
    Last edited by Eggburt1969; 2nd April 2020 at 08:18 AM. Reason: Added 2S1 load-out.

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