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  1. #1
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    38 cm “Siegfried” shells

    I was wondering if anyone had any pictures of this type of shells? I have tried to find pictures of this type shell on the net, but I have not been very successful. I am also looking for pictures of the nose and base fuzes used in these type of shells.

    All information is much appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Hi Dwight,
    I have no photos of the shells, just some diagrams.
    For all purpouses the Hbgr.Z.40 looks the same as Hbgr.Z.35 (IMG 4979)

    Bob
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    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

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  4. #3
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    Many thanks for the information! Is the Hbgr.Z.40 considered to be rare? What is the difference between the Z.35 and the Z.40?

  5. #4
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    The HbgrZ40 has different safety band (10) to accommodate for the different arming forces and the needle housing (22) is held by a shear wire (33) which the HbgrZ 35 does not have.

    As to the rarity...I do not have one :-) Or the BdZ 40 for that matter. Considering the use only in 38 and 40 cm ammunition I would say there are not many left.

    Maybe in Koblenz, Overloon or other museums. Maybe someone has photos?


    Bob
    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

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  7. #5
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    In my old collection I had a number of head and bottom fuses for these large grenades (Hbgr. Z. 35K, Dopp. Z.S. 45-125, etc.). You can see it on my HP www.harryszuenderecke.de under old collection. Could take a look. Harry
    Search always English and US Bomb Fuzes!

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  9. #6
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    Hi Harry,
    I know Your excelent site. That was some collection You had.
    The "35" fuzes are much more common than the "40". I do not think I have ever seen a "40" here in the Czech Republic.
    Bob
    any live or recovered ordnance shown in my posts was dealt with by trained EOD personnel

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    Dwight (30th October 2020)

  11. #7
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    Many thanks for the information! Will take a look at www.harryszuenderecke.de

  12. #8
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    In a Norwegian handbook I found 2 more 38 cm shells. The lay-out of the Zt.Z. S/5 W is identical to the steel version of the Zt.Z S/30 with the difference that it is threaded W50 x 1/8" and that it runs max. 5 sec. The capital W on these fuzes means that they have Whitwort threading, which was often seen on German naval shells.
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    Last edited by greif; 30th October 2020 at 09:16 PM.

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  14. #9
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    Very interesting information and many thanks! Attached some German information and two pictures of the tool for the Zt.Z. S/5. The Zt.Z. S/5 was used for close combat ("Nahkampf").

    ZZS5-2.jpgZZS5-1.jpg38cm-2.jpg38cm-1.jpg

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  16. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight View Post
    Very interesting information and many thanks! Attached some German information and two pictures of the tool for the Zt.Z. S/5. The Zt.Z. S/5 was used for close combat ("Nahkampf").
    Very nice to see, thank you for showing. These fuzes are rare, but the fuze setting device is even rarer.

 

 
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