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  1. #11
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    DSCN8252.jpg

    I've currently got a drill version, which may have an unmarked cap. Nothing seems to be showing through the paint, anyway.
    Author of 'British Rifle Grenades of the Great War', 'Mills Grenade Development 1915-1918' and 'Private Nurse Goes To War'

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  3. #12
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    Here's my minty drill No14.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  5. #13
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    20220627_184721[2063].jpg20220627_184732[2064].jpg20220627_184745[2066].jpg20220627_184757[2065].jpg

    Steel body with pressed on steel cap ... Elusive No 13 light Pitcher body? What do you guys think??
    Last edited by king ratgre; 27th June 2022 at 10:34 PM.

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  7. #14
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    https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C222035


    Please see attached link:

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  9. #15
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    It looks like a locally produced light pitcher - possibly made in Egypt rather than the UK. Possible theory?
    Author of 'British Rifle Grenades of the Great War', 'Mills Grenade Development 1915-1918' and 'Private Nurse Goes To War'

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  11. #16
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    Why not UK manufacturer?
    Last edited by king ratgre; 30th June 2022 at 06:21 PM. Reason: spelling

  12. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millsman View Post
    It looks like a locally produced light pitcher - possibly made in Egypt rather than the UK. Possible theory?
    Yes a theory. It's not to the original design. Some grenades were locally made in Egypt, so this one is also a possible contender. There was always a shortage of grenades in Gallipoli and Egypt was the nearest place to make them.

    As an aside, the IRA also made a very similar grenade to that(Below), so easy to turn up on a lathe.

    IRA.jpg
    Last edited by Millsman; 3rd July 2022 at 10:03 AM.
    Author of 'British Rifle Grenades of the Great War', 'Mills Grenade Development 1915-1918' and 'Private Nurse Goes To War'

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  14. #18
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    This grenade body was originally listed by seller as an improvised IRA device,but when I got it, I tried to google similar looking images. However, the only reference points I could find are the AWM image & the description & drawing on Snufkin's reply to original post.With a machine finished steel body and shrunk on steel base.....do you think my assertion that this is a No13 light body is correct regardless of country of manufacture ??

  15. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by king ratgre View Post
    ...do you think my assertion that this is a No13 light body is correct?
    It is not unreasonable.

    Some dimensions would help - internal diameter, maximum external diameter and length of tube to bottom of cap. The dimensions will help to confirm that the common inner explosive container used on both the light and heavy pitchers will fit well, or not.

    The body of the No.13 was not cast steel but machined drawn seamless steel tube, and could not - without a hugely unjustified effort - be machined to have the pyramidal shaped segments of the cast No.14 (which was the whole point of Sangster's patent No.5900 of 20 April 1915). The contract for 10,000 No.13 was placed with Roburite and Ammonal Ltd on 13 April 1915, and machining seamless tube and steel plate for grenades bodies was well within the company's experience - they made No.3 rifle grenades and No.12 box grenades. The company also had pressed steel plate experience of making No.8 dual cylinder grenades.

    With the caveat that dimensions are not yet given, the two examples (post #13 and the AWM Gallipoli find) seem to match the sectional drawing and description quoted in post #7. It might have been expected that there would be four annular series of eight segments like the No.14, rather than four of six segments, but fewer has the benefit of less machining and still matches the drawing. (The Battye only had four rings of six segments, and even Sangster in his patent No.5900 for a cast body suggested four rings of six in the first drawing shown in the document.)
    Last edited by Snufkin; 3rd July 2022 at 06:55 PM. Reason: Typo

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  17. #20
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    Snufkin (3rd July 2022)

 

 
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