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  1. #1
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    Swiss 140mm munition





    Museum in Thun(as far as i understand) has a lot of interesting APFSDS in collection, but almost no any good photos

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  3. #2
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    I'm guessing the G stands for Granate, but Mz ?

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgdbdr View Post
    I'm guessing the G stands for Granate, but Mz ?

    How about 'Mehrzweckgranate', literally multi-purpose grenade, or in English multi-purpose projectile.

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    Officially drooling!

    It is so rare seeing any good photos of 140mm APFSDS and these are spectacular. Totally saving them for my reference photo collection. Thanks so much for sharing.

    Jason

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    Thanks for the great photos.
    Interesting that the dart is smooth and doesn't have any grooves on it to hold it in place with the sabot petals. Anyone know how that is done?
    Dave.
    Last edited by SG500; 25th January 2022 at 09:35 PM.

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SG500 View Post
    Thanks for the great photos.
    Interesting that the dart is smoth and doesn't have any grooves on it to hold it in place with the sabot petals. Anyone know how that is done?
    Dave.

    It's not smooth if you look closely, especially near the front. It would seem to have a very fine pitched thread, that or the thread has been partially machined away. If it's got a very fine pitched thread, then it's possible that it uses a sheathed penetrator. In this case there's an outer sheath, which is normally a very high strength steel type such as a maraging, that encapsulates an inner rod, or a series of rods (aka a segmented penetrator).
    Last edited by Eggburt1969; 25th January 2022 at 10:01 PM.

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  10. #7
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    fins are strange, welded to a body, either jacketed penetrator, or simply a mockup



    and shape of fins nothing similar to any other 140mm

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolchonok View Post
    fins are strange, welded to a body, either jacketed penetrator, or simply a mockup and shape of fins nothing similar to any other 140mm
    It's a Swiss projectile, so different from those developed as part of the Advanced Tank Cannon (ATAC) system, Future Tank Main Armament (FTMA), and other NATO programmes.

    The fins may be welded to the penetrator rod or its sheath, after some form of recess is cut into it, to minimise much of the parasitic non-penetrating mass of the fin assembly/unit.

    In the West the fin unit is commonly a largish aluminium alloy object that is screwed on to the rear of the penetrator assembly. Other than providing stability and being a place to house a tracer, it generally doesn't aid penetration. This as the projectile velocity is simply too low and hence the impact pressure not high enough for aluminium alloys to penetrate the armour plating to any satisfactory degree. Even if constructed from a high-strength steel, its penetration capability will not be as good as the high-density alloys of tungsten or uranium.

    The use of welded fins minimises the fin unit's parasitic mass by removing the non-fin parts of the unit. It may also result in a penetrator assembly that is almost whole length of the projectile. Both these factors will maximise a given weight projectile's penetration capabilities.
    Last edited by Eggburt1969; 26th January 2022 at 09:40 AM.

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    I love when the Science is explained. Thanks :-)

    Jason

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    Two schemes (patent figures) of Swiss sheathed, high length-to-diameter aspect projectiles.

    Features were welded fins, full-length core with predetermined breaking points (or with two separate frontal and after segments), partially exposed core at the front. The size of grooves of projetcile-sabot connection might be very different than in case of monolitic APFSDS, where there was a shaped joint between heavy metal (WHA, DU) and light alloy (AL); in this case sabot (AL, rigid composite) is connected to sheath, which could be also of light alloy (AL, TI) or rigid composite. How I understand it is quite important if such joint is between two rigid materials or between rigid and elastic.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Przezdzieblo; 27th January 2022 at 07:11 PM.

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