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Thread: Oddball Case !

  1. #11
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    Hi Tony, I posted a reply titled "very very little john" on 21 Oct 08. Now sure how to link to that one but if you use the search function you will see a few on there.
    Dave.

  2. #12
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    Any Live or Dug ordnance shown by me has been disposed of by military EOD personnel .


    Site administrator. damned if i do..damned if i dont


    BOCN HELPING TO PROMOTE SAFE RESPONSIBLE ORDNANCE COLLECTING


  3. #13
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    Thanks Spotter.
    Dave.

  4. #14
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    .450/303

    As promised, here is a picture of the .450 NE necked to .303. It was developed in the 1935-36 period to be fired from modified P.14 rifles to assess the penetration against armour plate. This was in connection with the design of a potential new .303 rimless infantry cartridge to be used in a converted P.14. Although WW2 stopped the development of the new rifle and cartridge, I believe the .450/303 continued to be used as a plate test cartridge throughout the war.



    Looking through my files of Ordnance Board Proceedings I discovered that the requirement for a high velocity .55/7.92mm round that I mentioned was developed in Canada actually started as a British requirement in 1940.

    Perhaps it was handed over to Canada to develop? I will try to find out more.

    Regards
    TonyE

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyE View Post

    Subsequently the calibre was increased to 7mm and the case shortened. The propellant was held in a clear celluloid bag and the case drilled in to allow gas escape through the venturi. Some cases were maded as two piece cases with the two halves screwed together.

    The bullets were exceptionally long for the calibre.

    Picture shows both types of case and an undrilled one.



    Projectiles.


    Of course, none of these small calibre types ever saw service but the 3.45" recoiless gun did in limited numbers.

    Regards
    TonyE

    PS I should add that the 7mm photos are not from my collection!
    Great pics, Tony, I wouldn't mind one of those....

    Are you sure that the gun for them was recoilless? I have a vague memory niggling at me that the perforations were to allow the gases to expand into a larger chamber to give a kind of high/low pressure system, for extra efficiency, but I could be wrong.

 

 
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