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  1. #1
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    Ultimate time clock

    Another of my weaknesses is historical pocket
    watches.

    This one is a London made pair case verge movement
    watch which hallmarks dates to 1787.

    It was in need of a full restoration as it hadnt run for a long time.
    The hand peircings are simply superb as these were part of the features
    of watchmaking back then.

    You can see swans or such like birds on the balance wheel gaurd
    and plenty of engravings elswere.
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  2. #2
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    Nice one Phil,
    Im due to put a bar in a blokes house this January who lives near me and he also collects these fine watches.I recall he said his pride of collection was from around a similar date to yours?
    I shall take the trusty camera and get some shots for you if required?

    cheers

    waff

  3. #3
    Fuzeman
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    My old Gun smith you to collect Pocket watches and historic Cameras

  4. #4
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    Sounds good to me mate
    see if he has any chiming watches called repeaters as they are an absolute mint.

    Best phil

  5. #5
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    Tonight i had to give them a once a month wind up and i wound

    76 watches and three failed to start,sticky movements time

    so they will have to go with the 17 clocks.


    Best phil

  6. #6
    Fuzeman
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    Hi Phil
    I love digital clocks , when i worked in the Hospital our department were tasked with replacing the battries and setting the time pieces in the hospital it used to take 2 days to do .
    I still have a lovely 1930 mantle clock which i love the sound of also a Jfeder 21 day demolision timer made by Jurghens , i try to keep going.
    Steve

  7. #7
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    Hi I'm not a collector of watches, in fact I don't even wear one but I thought this would interest you.
    The watch in the photo was brought back from France in WW1 by a great great uncle. It was given to my Grandad who took it with him throughout WW2. He was in France, evacuated from Dunkirk, captured in Singapore and worked on the Burma railway construction and died there. The watch was hidden in a box and recovered after the war by one of his mates who returned it to my Gran. It gets wound once a year and still works perfectly!! The wrist strap (nothing to do with the watch) shown next to it is interesting, he wore it throughout his capture and this too was returned after the war - the hole where the buckle is shows a wrist measurement of 6.5 inches - wrists get quite thin in such environments!!
    If any watch experts out there can give me a bit more information on the watch it would be appreciated - there is an arrow and number on the back of it.
    Thanks.
    Dave.
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  8. #8
    Fuzeman
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    Hi Phil
    Im sure ive seen a Elgin watch collectors site somewhere , i seen elgin watches for sale on ebay
    Steve

  9. #9
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    Might as well join in--- Long Case Clock

    I have this , I took it on a bad debt many years ago, dated March 24, 1779 (clock, not the debt - or was it ?). I can't get a good full length shot. Needs a tune up though and a part.
    I forgot, this needs a Military connection --- Well it was a Militaria Dealer that owed me !
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    Last edited by Gspragge; 2nd January 2009 at 07:50 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SG500 View Post
    Hi I'm not a collector of watches, in fact I don't even wear one but I thought this would interest you.
    The watch in the photo was brought back from France in WW1 by a great great uncle. It was given to my Grandad who took it with him throughout WW2. He was in France, evacuated from Dunkirk, captured in Singapore and worked on the Burma railway construction and died there. The watch was hidden in a box and recovered after the war by one of his mates who returned it to my Gran. It gets wound once a year and still works perfectly!! The wrist strap (nothing to do with the watch) shown next to it is interesting, he wore it throughout his capture and this too was returned after the war - the hole where the buckle is shows a wrist measurement of 6.5 inches - wrists get quite thin in such environments!!
    If any watch experts out there can give me a bit more information on the watch it would be appreciated - there is an arrow and number on the back of it.
    Thanks.
    Dave.
    Hi Dave
    What a nice story to go with the watch.
    The watch is an American made Elgin.
    and dates from roughly the early part of the twentieth century say 1900 1910.
    Elgin and Waltham watch companys made time pieces for the US govenment so this might have been swapped or won at cards or a present
    to your grandad from american troops in france,as i have no record of the states making watches for our goverment.
    Although i cannot explain the crows foot on the back there may have been
    some small quantities supplied to the Uk,but we were one of the leading watch making countries back then,so there wasnt any need.

    From value point of veiw it is not overly expensive,but it is priceless with the backing of family history.
    In WW1 it was common practise to have pocket watches worn on the wrist by way of a large watch cover attached to a strap hense you can see how the modern wrist watch evolved.

    Thanks for showing it to me and keep it safe for it already has volumes
    to tell.

    Best Phil

 

 
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