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  1. #21
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    Try some vinegar as well, just did up a Ross bayonet and it came out very nicely.

    This is cheap and available at any grocery store.

  2. #22
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    I'm a huge fan of electrolysis, place item in bucket, large spoon of soda mixed with warm water to cover object, connect car battery charger (positive connected to an old bit of steel) and 3 hours later it's done.

    Bren tripod T&E before/after.

  3. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to DanTheMan For This Useful Post:

    AE501 (24th April 2017), Andysarmoury (6th December 2018), Bonnex (28th April 2017), Burney Davis (24th April 2017), Dronic69 (16th September 2018), Fjordhouse (27th April 2017), highlandotter (28th April 2017), Montagu (24th April 2017), NZ L1A1 Collector (29th April 2017), WWIIBuff (10th February 2018), ydnum303 (24th April 2017)

  4. #23
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    the best is citric acid but not strong.or electrolysis

  5. #24
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    Electrolysis is an easy method that is basically chemical free, but it also removes paint. For items where you want to remover the rust, but retain the paint, what works better Oxalic Acid, or something like this Evapo-Rust product?

  6. #25
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    That Bren T&E gear has come up very well, pity there isn't anyone in the UK doing one off phosphating jobs.

  7. #26
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    Electrolysis certainly does the job - but you need to keep an eye on it as left unattended it will blow out the rust pits! - remember it works at the micro level.
    (depends also on how much sodium bi-carbonate is added as well)

    Recently I have been using vinegar to restore a vintage ~1920s vertical steam engine used in a launch - yes slower than electrolysis but safer to leave objects soak overnight and then bench-top wire brush off - repeat to fully remove the "tea stain" after the first soaking.

    This puppy has been neglected for decades - the piston was seized and the reverse gear was out of alignment - got it fully functional and now in the final restoration phase.

    Here are some pre/post shots: (Restoration is still WIP)

    Enjoy!
    Cheers
    Drew

    BTW - the base /crank shaft bearing housing have been painted with hammerite - provides a nice "hammer" effect - great for surface that are rust pitted.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Dronic69; 16th September 2018 at 08:34 AM.

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  9. #27
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    Vinegar works great, but it's a bit harsh and will chew holes in materials like tinplate if left a bit too long. Just this afternoon I purchased a quantity of molasses with a view towards using it to de-rust a set of WWII Australian mess tins I'd picked up cheap which were covered in surface rust.

 

 
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