Welcome to the Inert Ordnance Collectors.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Illinois U.S.
    Posts
    4,025
    Images
    65
    Thanks
    103
    Thanked 92 Times in 63 Posts

    model of 1917 US trench broom

    In WW1 the US government purchased some 35,000 short-barreled repeating (5 shot pump action) 12-gauge shotguns from various manufacturers. The model 1897 and 1912 Winchester, and model 11 Remington were the principal guns purchased. All were 12-gauge barrels with metal handguards and attachment provisions for the M1917 Enfield bayonet. all were blued and became known as M1917 after modification or affectionately nicknamed the "TRENCH BROOM". they were manufactured primarily for the purpose of arming guards placed over enemy prisoners, but were found to be extremely effective on night patrols and in the protection of outposts against attack by superior numbers. Some American soldiers especially skilled at trap shooting, positioned themselves with shotguns to shoot enemy grenades midair to prevent them from falling into allied trenches. Although the German Government protested the AEF's use of shotguns, American soldiers used them right up until the end of the war.
    Last edited by dano1917; 30th May 2009 at 01:09 PM.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to dano1917 For This Useful Post:

    oldcenturion (1st October 2016)

  3. #2
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    888
    Images
    16
    Thanks
    89
    Thanked 88 Times in 44 Posts
    Nice... thanks for the info.... I love my '97.... traded my Model 12 for it....


    Last edited by MissingSomething; 1st June 2009 at 03:03 AM.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to MissingSomething For This Useful Post:

    oldcenturion (1st October 2016)

  5. #3
    Ordnance Approved/premium membership
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    UK - EU
    Posts
    615
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 140 Times in 45 Posts
    Winchester Model 97 Shotgun: The Original Trench Gun

    The Winchester Model 97 was designed by John M. Browning as an improved version of the Winchester Model 93. The shotgun's firepower was used to stop German attacks cold, something previously only a crew-served machine gun could do. Fitted with a bayonet and barrel heat shield it was a soldier's best friend in close quarters, when hand-to-hand fighting was upon him. For these reasons, it was called a "trench gun" or "trench broom."
    Winchester Model 97 Shotgun History

    At the beginning of U.S. involvement in World War I, Gen. John J. Pershing ("Black Jack") was given command. He was determined that U.S. forces would not settle into the static trench warfare that had already chewed up tens of thousands of lives on the European battlefield. The key was the ability to stop short any German attack from their own trenches before they could overrun American positions, while being able to infiltrate and clean out the enemy trenches in turn.

    The ideal weapon would be shorter than the standard rifle and easier to bring to bear on nearby targets in tight spaces like a trench or building, superior in these characteristics to the 1903 Springfield or 1917 Enfield infantry rifles. The Model 97 proved quite capable in all respects as well as being low maintanance and reliable. It quickly became known as the "trench broom". In the military version, with its ventilated handguard over the barrel and M1917 bayonet attachment, it was legendary for its tremendous firepower. It became so feared by the Germans that they tried to get shotguns outlawed in combat.

    The Model 97 continued to be used by the U.S. military in World War II, along with the similar design Winchester Model 12 Combat Shotgun. Collectors will notice that there was a change in the ventilated heat shield during WW II from the WW I design of six rows of holes to only 4 rows starting in 1942.

    The M97 shotgun was extremely successfull, both with the military and in civilian markets for hunters and law enforcement, remaining on sale until the late 1950s by which time over 1 million had been shipped. The Model 97 continued to be used by U.S. forces in the Korean War, in Vietnam and even the Gulf War at which point the design was almost 100 years in use. All branches of the U.S. armed forces made some use of the Model 97 over its service lifetime.

    Winchester Model 1897 Shotgun Description
    The 12 gauge Winchester M97, in trench gun or riot gun style, was a pump-action shotgun with an exposed hammer and a 5 round tubular magazine beneath the 18 inch barrel. One round could be in the chamber bringing capacity to six rounds total. It was chambered for the short 2 3/4-inch shells only.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by jayteepee_1999; 30th May 2009 at 10:44 AM.
    All Items of Live Ordnance posted by me have been disposed of professionally by EOD. Unless they are Archive Pictures from another Webpage

  6. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Illinois U.S.
    Posts
    4,025
    Images
    65
    Thanks
    103
    Thanked 92 Times in 63 Posts

    Trench Broom

    Thanks Jayteepee, Awesome write-up. When a trench was attacked with superior numbers it was found that at times the high power rifle would not stop a madly advancing soldier, with the bullet passing through and the soldier even in his death lurch could still get upon the defender. The 12-gauge shotgun almost guaranteed that it would stop a man in his tracks like a "pancake tackle". What a wicked looking weapon. The TRENCH BROOM surely has a rich history. Dano
    Last edited by dano1917; 30th May 2009 at 12:55 PM.

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top