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Thread: Grenade blank

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    Grenade blank

    Can any one identify this grenade blank? I have seen a 6.5x50 Arisuka blank the same as this, this cartridge case lenght is 55mm & a calibre of 7mm,the head stamp is of the French style??\ 6 /\ /\ 7 /\ 070 /
    Tony
    Last edited by smle2009; 2nd August 2009 at 12:37 AM.

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    Looks like a gallery round for the sweedish 6.5mm mauser
    Hangarman

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    I think that you are right hangarman .
    Head stamps is also sweedish, with year of production.
    Bane

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    6.5mm

    The round is indeed the Swedish 6.5mm short range training round made at Karlsborg (070) in 1967.

    This round was in British service as a sub calibre loading for the 84mm Carl Gustav anti-tank weapon and was known as the "Round 6.5mm Indoor L11A1" A reduced charge sub calibre tracer in the same calibre was the L10A1 and was identified by a white bullet tip and half of the base of the case stained black.

    Incidently, the 6.5mm Japanese Arisaka round with a similar bullet is also a short range gallery cartridge and not a blank!

    Regards
    TonyE

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    Hi TonyE,
    Thanks once more,I found the info ref the Arisuka" grenade blanks" in The cartridge collectors exchange web site,they also show a version made by Kynoch in 1916 for use in Arisuka rifles bought by the British goverment for use by the home guard, which had a nickle round nose & was also a grenade blank.(K16 II)
    I do know we had Arisuka's during WW1,most issued to the navy,I think. Not too sure about the home guard bit in 1916!!!!! would this also have been a gallery round?
    Sorry about asking so many questions,it makes a change to get correct answers!
    Regards Tony

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    6.5 Arisaka

    I had a look at the reference you gave for the cartridge collector's exchange and he should be ashamed of himself! Grenade blanks my...***.!

    As it happens, you have come to the right place, because I wrote the best (because it is the only) book on the Arisaka in British service. We had 150,000 Type 30 and 38 rifles and carbines and they were known as .256" calibre in British service.

    The first 50,000 went to the Royal Navy to release Lee Enfields for the army at the end of 1914 and the remainder were used to train the Kitchener New Armies. There was no "Home Guard" in WWI, although there was a volunteer defence corps, but they had Martinis.

    As the production of L-E rifles increased, so the need for the non standard Arisakas lessened. Japan had also supplied Russia with about 400,000 Arisakas so we sent most of ours to Russia starting in 1916, eventually sending about 128,000. We sent a few to the Arabs under Lawrence and had about 17,000 left in stock at the end of the war. These were eventually sold and ended up in Finland.

    Initially we used Japanese ammo with the Type 38 spitzer bullet which was the .256 inch Mark I, then Kynoch and Royal Laboratory started manufacturing the older Type 30 round nosed bullet. This was mainly for use by Russia but was also used by UK troops and was the .256 inch Mark II. It is one of these that is shown on that web site. The Kynoch rounds were headstamped in 1916 and 1917, but the RL production had a plain head. It can be fairly easily identified though because it uses a small copper primer that is invariably slightly off centre.

    That is a very brief synopsis of the British connection but the book tells all, including the rifles and carbines, ammo, drill rounds, chargers and packaging etc., etc.

    End of commercial break!

    Cheers
    TonyE

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    Many thanks TonyE,
    Is your book still in print? If so do you know the ISBN No.?
    Cheers Tony

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    Arisaka

    Drop me an e-mail to aoe303ATbtconnectDOTcom and I will send you details of the British secondary Weapons books and the .303 headstamp guide. They can all be ordered through me.

    Regards
    TonyE

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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyE View Post
    Drop me an e-mail to aoe303ATbtconnectDOTcom and I will send you details of the British secondary Weapons books and the .303 headstamp guide. They can all be ordered through me.

    Regards
    TonyE
    I have all of TonyE's books and they are well worth the money IMO.

  10. #10
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    Books

    Why, thank you Sir!

    Cheers
    TonyE

 

 

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