Welcome to the Inert Ordnance Collectors.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Derby
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    ICI .22lr ammunition, dated 1945

    First post here, and the reason is, I have just picked up a box of 100 (I think) ICI .22lr ammunition. It's date samped 1945. Several rounds appear to have been tried, with firing pin indents, but still intact, so I presume they were tried recently.

    Are they worth anything?

  2. #2
    HONOURED MEMBER RIP
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,193
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 555 Times in 286 Posts

    .22 lr

    Are you talking about the normal 100 round box of military .22LR, probably still Mark I in 1945? Square box with white label and green printing. (Mark II would have red printing)

    These are not particularly scarce, but it would be better to keep them than to shoot them. It is getting harder to find WW2 boxes.

    If you have something different, please post details.

    Regards and welcome to the Forum.
    TonyE

  3. #3
    Fuzeman
    Guest
    That was the ammunition we used at our rifle club in the late 80,s i sold the empty box on ebay for 8.50 , a full box was 1.50p

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    508
    Thanks
    64
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Would these be the copper cased rounds? Used to find them on ex MOD land as a child. I imagine they had been used for 'rabbiting' during the war as the area was woodland and not a range?
    Cheeres,
    navyman.

  5. #5
    HONOURED MEMBER RIP
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,193
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 555 Times in 286 Posts

    .22 lr

    Yes, the Mark I rounds are copper cased and the Mark II are brass cased. Before that there were several Marks of .22, including powder loaded and the .22 long (not Long Rifle).

    The really nice ones are those with the dished base and British military headstamps, RL, KN and I even have a Kirkee from India.

    Regards
    TonyE

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    508
    Thanks
    64
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Thanks Tony,
    Wish I had kept the .22 collection I had when younger, it included the .22 long which you refer to, and some .22 tracer, I still had the empty box (Military), untill a couple of marriage's ago! Also some fairground short rounds which as I remember were very fragile and powdered on impact with the falling ducks, seem to remember trying to remove the projectile from one, (picked up from the ground at Billy Mannings Fairground), with a pair of pliers and it just disintegrated. Am I getting too old and imagining these amusement arcade rounds?
    Cheers,
    navyman.

  7. #7
    HONOURED MEMBER RIP
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,193
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 555 Times in 286 Posts

    .22 Short

    No, you are not imagining them!. They went under names like "Spatterpruf" and millions of rounds were used at fairgrounds. The bullets were a compostion of lead dust and something like bakelite and as you say, shattered to dust on impact so that there was no possibility of any ricochets.

    Most of them (at least in the south) were supplied by Tom Collins at the London Armoury in the New Kent Road who also made a lot of the target frames and cut -out ducks for the fairground industry.

    Regards
    TonyE

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    508
    Thanks
    64
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Thanks Tony,
    Glad my memory is still mainly intact so they wont have to put me in a home yet.
    Do you happen to know anything about 37mm Gruson projectiles, not the solid shot ones? Also who are/were, U.M.C.Co.?
    Cheers,
    navyman.

  9. #9
    HONOURED MEMBER RIP
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,193
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 555 Times in 286 Posts

    U.M.C.Co

    U.M.C.Co. were the Union Metallic Cartridge Company and were one of the foremost manufacturers in the US, having been founded in 1867. The holding company of UMC purchased the Remington Arms Co. in 1888 and in 1912 the companies were merged to form Remington UMC, which still exists today.

    Their headstamp of "REM-UMC" is one of the best known in the world.

    All I know about Gruson revolving cannons is that they were basically the Hotchkiss gun built in Germany under licence.

    Regards
    TonyE

  10. #10
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    1,567
    Images
    13
    Thanks
    1,203
    Thanked 226 Times in 151 Posts

    22rf

    Hi Just thought i would show my boxes of 22RF the one on the right is still sealed
    Andy
    Attached Images Attached Images

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top