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  1. #1
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    Interesting .303 drill round (no headstamp)

    Today I got what appears to be a .303 D mark 5, whith the nickeled white metal case and red painted flutes. However, the unusual thing is that it has no headstamp. It is not well worn or polished, or poorly struck. The original plating is still intact and very thick, there has never been a headstamp there. Have I found a good round, or common variant?

    Cheers,
    Falcon

  2. #2
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    D Mark V

    I think you actually mean a D Mark VI, as the Mark V was a WWI variant that was blackened all over.

    Is the round you have a white metal case, which has no plating, or a plated case? I suspect what you have is a plated case variant of the D Mark 10, made in South Africa. The plating on these is quite thick and there was no headstamp.

    Regards
    TonyE

  3. #3
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    Nice drill round,here is one I have dated 1922,in well used condition.
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  4. #4
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    Drill

    These are the WWI drill rounds, left to right:

    Drill Mark IV with wood spitzer pointed bullet, introduced with the Matk VII ball round, but found to be too fragile as the point frequently broke off. Production reverted to the round nosed Mark III drill.

    Drill Mark V, blackened all over. Found difficult to distinguish from live rounds, especially in poor light.

    Drill Mark VI. Introduced in 1918. This is one of the early trial rounds, made with a white metal case (not plated). Various bullet securements were tried, with single and double cannelures. Remained in service until replaced by the D Mark 10 in 1950.

    Regards
    TonyE
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    Last edited by TonyE; 22nd September 2009 at 12:02 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyE View Post
    I think you actually mean a D Mark VI, as the Mark V was a WWI variant that was blackened all over.

    Is the round you have a white metal case, which has no plating, or a plated case? I suspect what you have is a plated case variant of the D Mark 10, made in South Africa. The plating on these is quite thick and there was no headstamp.

    Regards
    TonyE
    I did actually mean D Mark VI, not V.

    Also, it is a plated case rather than a white metal case, so it looks like the South African D10 is what I have. What was the official nomenclature of that round?

    Cheers
    Falcon

 

 

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