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Thread: Flechettes

  1. #11
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    Well if your looking for air dropped Flechettes Check out the CBU-107 Passive Attack Weapon.
    "A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have" - Thomas Jefferson

  2. #12
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    Here are a couple of examples, the typical ones were as seen, a straight cut piece of rod, about the size of a pencil and heavy enough to do damage from the fall alone. A number of fin designs were used, and eventually larger incendiary filled versions were tried.

    The idea was revised for WWII and brought back by the US in the Lazy Dog, another kinetic energy dart which was packaged a hundred or so in a paper sack, the sacks were then loaded into a dispenser. The Lazy Dog variations I've found so far are in the fifth photo. Toxic versions were also tried by other countries in WWII.

    As Bombs mentions, everything old is new again. The US has once again brought back the kinetic energy dart, but its fairly new and good open source photos are still pretty hard to find.
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    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to US-Subs For This Useful Post:

    apfsds (26th July 2021), vinnyw (12th November 2012)

  4. #13
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    Jeff,

    In the first couple of photos the flechettes are shown packed 'head to tail'. Obviously, after ejection, those initially facing the wrong way should correctly orientate themselves. Do you know how effective this was and what effect it had upon performance?

    Thanks

    TimG

  5. #14
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    Considering the release velocity, I don't think they had much trouble orienting themselves. If you look closely at the photo/x-ray of the projectile that is opening (the first part of the post), you will see that nearly all appear to be facing forward, and less than half have deployed.

    At the same time I have played with some of the popular flechette shotgun loads that can be purchased - after firing into wood and clay a significant percentage were found to be imbedded tail first or sideways, at a variety of ranges. This could be due to insufficient velocity or poor packing/quality control, but its interesting.
    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

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    "Do you have any photos of the Russian 122 and 152mm Beehive rounds?"

    To my regret not, but I know for fact the Russians used to cast the flechettes in the shellbody at random, than poured stearine fat (the stuff you make candles from) over it to change it into one pack. After release , the stearine fat is thrown off due to the sudden release into the airstream.
    Next time I go to the MTM I'll take some pictures.
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  7. #16
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    Hi US Subs,
    Thanks for starting a fascinating thread even if it does not have it's own section. The idea of these seems to be as old as the hills but still being played with in one form or another, i have a French WW1 Flechette in my collection but thats it, the picture you posted of the round expeling its load of flechettes is amazing, just one of those rounds would cover quite an area i would imagine.
    Best regards Weasel.

  8. #17
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    Very nice US subs - thanks for showing them.
    Dave.

  9. #18
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    Out of all of my favorite devices for launching "Pins with Fins" has to be the 2.75 inch rocket used on gunships (helicopters), SPAD"s, and fighter/fighter bombers. The rocket itself would fly a certain distance then the warhead would be blown open by a charge in the base of the warhead there by releasing the flechete rounds. Orange carpenter's chalk would appear during this time to let the pilot know that his rockets had successfuly launched the flechetes from the rocket. JUST FYI

  10. #19
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    W.W.1 F's Long nails.

    Quote Originally Posted by navyman View Post
    Has anyone information on the WW1 flechette's being dropped from early aircraft, or is this just another story?
    Cheers,
    navyman.
    Hi, have two types here somewhere - if required will photo and post image. Cheers, RonB.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by V40 View Post
    Out of all of my favorite devices for launching "Pins with Fins" has to be the 2.75 inch rocket used on gunships (helicopters), SPAD"s, and fighter/fighter bombers. The rocket itself would fly a certain distance then the warhead would be blown open by a charge in the base of the warhead there by releasing the flechete rounds. Orange carpenter's chalk would appear during this time to let the pilot know that his rockets had successfuly launched the flechetes from the rocket. JUST FYI
    One point to note - as I recall (we're talking a long time ago here) the red-orange dye packs in the 2.75-inch were much more than carpenter's chalk. Like so many other things from the 60's-70's, the early versions of the dye packs (at least) were later identified as highly carcinogenic. In the early 80's we had specific warnings in the TM60 series (EOD bookset) to the hazard and we were instructed to go around to training areas and ensure that all dyepacks had been pulled from otherwise inert rockets on the training shelves. Unfortunately many had the packs ruptured, coating all the flechettes in orange dye. I believe the dyepacks were eventually brought back in a less hazardous form, but cannot reference that.
    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

 

 
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