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  1. #1
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    US Mark II-P Aircraft Bomb

    The US adopted the British Cooper bomb as standard during WWI. The Mark II 25 pound fragmentation bomb was the result. We also adopted the Cooper bomb fuze and designated it the Mark XII nose fuze. We modified the fuze to meet our requirement of being able to drop the bomb unarmed in case of aircraft problems. A small eye screw was attached to the fuze body and a hole drilled in one arming vane. The arming safety wire was passed from the aircraft through these so that the bomb could be dropped with the arming wire still in place. I've attached photos of my Mark II-P version of the bomb. The fuze is complete, but everything is totally inert. It even has the original shipping cover for the fuze. This particular item holds a special place in my collection because an old friend showed up at my door several years ago and gave it to me saying he found it in an old foot locker in his attic. Unfortunately that was all the footlocker had in it, but it was good enough for me.
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  3. #2
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    Very nice. I think that is the first one I've seen with the MK number on it. Here is mine in practice blue.
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    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

  4. #3
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    The one I have also has the eye screw and 2 holes in the arming vane (two different blades have one hole each). One lines up with the eyelet and the other aligns with the lug or boss on the fuse which also has a hole. It seems that two seperate wires were used, possibly one for shipping and the other for arming when released.
    I have seen one that had the flaming bomb ordnance mark on the fuse but the flame on this mark went fully sideways after exiting the top of the bomb, not upward as normal.
    I can see no stamp on mine but it may be covered by thick paint and I do not want to remove any paint.
    Since mine has the two wire configuration is it most likely a U.S. MK II and not a Cooper? Pat

  5. #4
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    Don't know Pat, I've got the US version in a couple of early pubs, but they are all packed now, waiting for shippers. Ask me again in a month or two.... Unless someone else can pull a document?
    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

  6. #5
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    Arming Wire

    The reference I have to the US modification of the fuze to accept the arming wire says only one hole. Could very well be that earlier or later versions had two. It is my understanding that the British at the time did not have the requirement to drop bombs in the unarmed condition so they had no holes present. Someone more knowledgeable than I am might be able to clear that up. It is also possible that when first adopted by the US we procured bombs with unmodified fuzes from the British so we may have some floating around that are "US", but with unmodified fuzes.

  7. #6
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    The bomb you show in your post of 1 March 2010 is actually a Mk II-B 25-lb Fragmentation Bomb - an American produced version of the UK Cooper bomb. I suspect that the elements have erased the lower loop of the letter "B". This particular weapon was, of course, copied from the British and dubbed the Mark II-B (later Mk III Frag.), with one variant designated Mk II-C (later Mk IV Frag.). If you have info to substantiate the II-P designation - I'd love to see it! Other WWI era U.S. frag bombs included the Mk I, Mk II, Mk II-A and the Mk III (all converted artillery projectiles). Nice piece.

 

 

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