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  1. #1
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    BLU-26/B, 36/B, 61/B, 63/B, M38/M40 M219(E1) fuze

    Description of the clusterbombs (CBU / Cluster Bomb Unit):
    CBU / Cluster Bomb Unit: Clusterbomb (container housing the clusterbombs)
    BLU / Bomb Live Unit : Single bomb from clusterbom container

    The BLU-26/B "Guava" was an air-dispensed APAM (anti-personnel/anti-material) fragmentation bomblet with 600 embedded steel fragments. The BLU-26/B had three different fuzing options. It could detonate immediately on impact, as an airburst 9 m (30 ft) above ground, or after a selectable but fixed time after impact. The externally identical BLU-36/B and BLU-59/B had random-delay fuzes.

    The BLU-26/B was used as payload in the following cluster bombs:
    • CBU-23/B (BLU-26/B in SUU-31/B)
    • CBU-24/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30/B)
    • CBU-24A/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30A/B)
    • CBU-24B/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30B/B)
    • CBU-24C/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30C/B)
    In 1966/67, the BLU-26/B bomblet was also evaluated as a payload for the AGM-12C Bullpup guided missile. These tests probably led to the development of the AGM-12E variant, which had an anti-personnel cluster bomb warhead using BLU-26/B bomblets.

    Data for BLU-26/B:
    Diameter: 64 mm (2.5 in)
    Weight: 435 g (0.95 lb)
    Explosive: 85 g (0.19 lb) Cyclotol


    The BLU-36/B was a variant of the BLU-26/B APAM (anti-personnel/anti-material) fragmentation bomblet with a randomly timed delay fuze, i.e. it detonated at an unpredictable time after impact.

    The BLU-36/B was used as payload in the following cluster bombs:
    • CBU-24/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30/B)
    • CBU-24A/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30A/B)
    • CBU-24B/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30B/B)
    • CBU-24C/B (665 BLU-26/B or BLU-36/B in SUU-30C/B)
    • CBU-29/B (670 BLU-36/B in SUU-30/B)
    • CBU-29A/B (670 BLU-36/B in SUU-30A/B)
    • CBU-29B/B (670 BLU-36/B in SUU-30B/B)
    • CBU-29C/B (670 BLU-36/B in SUU-30C/B)
    Data for BLU-36/B:

    Diameter: 64 mm (2.5 in)
    Weight: 435 g (0.95 lb)
    Explosive: 85 g (0.19 lb) Cyclotol

    The BLU-61/B was an aerially dispensed anti-material fragmentation and incendiary bomblet. It was spin-armed and detonated on impact. The bomblet consisted of two hemispheres, both with a fragmentation liner of coined steel and a liner for zirconium-tin for the incendiary effect. There was also a BLU-61A/B version, but information about the differences is not available. The BLU-61A/B was apparently the primary (and possibly only) variant used in service.

    The BLU-61A/B was used as payload in the following cluster bombs:
    • CBU-52/B (217 BLU-61A/B in SUU-30B)
    • CBU-52A/B (217 BLU-61A/B in SUU-30A/B)
    • CBU-52B/B (217 BLU-61A/B in SUU-30B/B)
    • CBU-76/B (290 BLU-61A/B in SUU-51B/B)
    Data for BLU-61A/B:

    Diameter: 99 mm (3.9 in)
    Weight: 1.2 kg (2.6 lb)
    Explosive: 277 g (0.61 lb) Octol

    The BLU-63/B was an aerially dispensed, centrifugally-armed, impact-fired anti-personnel/anti-material fragmentation bomblet. There was also a BLU-63A/B version, but confirmed information about the differences is not available (the -63A/B possibly had a secondary incendiary effect). The BLU-86( )/B series was externally identical to the BLU-63( )/B, but had a time-delayed fuze.

    The BLU-63( )/B was used as payload in the following cluster bombs:
    • CBU-58/B (650 BLU-63/B in SUU-30A/B)
    • CBU-58A/B (650 BLU-63A/B in SUU-30A/B)
    • CBU-75/B (1800 BLU-63/B in SUU-54A/B)
    • CBU-75A/B (1420 BLU-63/B and 355 BLU-86/B in SUU-54A/B)
    • CBU-77/B (790 BLU-63/B in SUU-51B/B)
    The CBU-75/B could be fitted with a KMU-421/B Paveway laser guidance kit, resulting in the GBU-2/B PAVE STORM guided bomb.

    Data for BLU-63/B:
    Diameter: 76 mm (3 in)
    Weight: 0.45 kg (1 lb)
    Explosive: 113 g (0.25 lb) Cyclotol.
    The BLU-63b was also used in Army Rocket artillery like the Lance missile and ATACMS, it was than called The M74 grenade. The fuse used in these missiles was the M219E2, which differs from the M219E1 in lubricant. 300pcs of M74 grenades were packed in the warhead of the Lance missile.

    The M38/M40,
    A smaller version of the ball shaped clusterbombs. The bomblet is also rotation armed. 950 pcs. these bomblets were packed in the warhead of the Lance missile.
    Diameter: 45 mm
    No further info about grenade or fuze is available. The M38/M40 in the picture is a dummy.
    The blue dummy is of an unknown type designation , however of US manufacturing
    Diameter: 48 mm
    An interesting piece of movie where this type of CBU’s can be seen in action:
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYXdk-qTl5U&feature=related"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYXdk-qTl5U&feature=related[/ame]
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by pzgr40; 18th March 2010 at 04:38 PM.
    Looking for / Suche noch:
    -8,8cm Pzgr.40.
    -8,8cm D (drahtsperre)

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    Ivashkin (17th December 2017)

  3. #2
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    M219(E1) fuze

    Description of impact fuze M-219(E1);

    The fuze exists of an upper (1) and lower body (2). The fuze is rotation armed. After relaese from the CBU (Clusterbomb container) or missile the ribs (flutes) on the outside of the body of the clusterbomb start to cause rotation untill the clusterbomb rotates very fast.

    The lower body (1) houses the rotation safety shutter (3), the spring loaded centrifugal safety segments (4), the firing cap (5) and the detonator (8). When rotating fast, the four centrifugal weights that lock the rotation safety shutter in safe position are thrown outward, overriding the springs (6). The rotation safety shutter is now free to rotate and the firing cap (7) is (spring)rotated over the detonator (8) and below the firing pin (9).

    The upper body (2) houses the arming vane (10) with itís rotation spring (11), the arming vane relase lever (12), the firing pin (9) and itís blade spring (13), the locking ball (14) for the firing pin and the bag with gel(15).
    On release the fast rotation of the clusterbomb throws the gel in the bag (blue) outward, thereby flattening the bag, creating enough space for the arming vane to rotate. The arming vane is rotated by means of a rotation wire spring (11). The arming vane release (yellow, 12) keeps a blade spring (red, above the release vane) in upward position, blocking the arming vane (10) from rotating.
    When, -after release from the CBU - the rotation safety shutter (3) rotates, it turns the arming vane release - hooked in a slot in the rotation safety shutter with itís lower part-, so enabeling the blade spring to move down and release the arming vane.
    The firing pin(9) is (blade)spring (13) loaded and has a recess in top in which a small ball (14) fits, keeping the firing pin in upward position. The arming vane has a slot on the outer circumference of itís shaft in which the ball fits, releasing the firing pin when the slot has rotated in line with the ball.
    In the picture it can be observed two types of arming vanes are used;

    type 1 with one slot (red arrow), meaning after rotating the arming vane the firing pin is released, exploding the clusterbomb, either in the air or on the ground.

    The type 2 has two slots (blue and red arrow); after rotation of the arming vane, the ball will fall into the first slot (blue arrow). As there is still spring tension on the arming vane by the rotation spring (11), the arming vane will have to rotate/creep to the red slot beside it to release the firing pin.
    I am not treally shure what happens next, but there are Ėin my opinion- two possibillities:

    * impact will make the ball (14) jump the next (red arrow) slot releasing the firing pin, exploding the clusterbomb instantly. (impact fuze)

    *After impact the rotation spring (11) will slowly start to rotate (creep) the arming vane, pushing away the gel in the bag until the ball falls in the next (red) slot, releasing the firing pin and exploding the clusterbomb. This forms a random time delay. As the clusterbomb does not rotate anymore after impact, the bag of gel has retaken itís original form causing more resistance than in a rotating clusterbomb. This increased resistance lengthens the time delay.
    I suppose the delay will probably also be dependant on the outside temperature as the gel in the bag will be thicker either thinner when used in artic either tropical conditions.

    I am not shure -maybe someone can tell me- that the fuze with the type 2 vane is the M-218 (0-120 minutes) random delay fuze or the M224 (0-30 minutes) random delay fuze. I have no further drawings, descriptions or info of this type of fuze.

    Regards , DJH
    Looking for / Suche noch:
    -8,8cm Pzgr.40.
    -8,8cm D (drahtsperre)

  4. #3
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    Wow! Excellent posts DJH!
    The russian ShOAB 0.5 cluster's fuze is total copy of the US BLU-26's fuze? Or have different russian fuze?
    Here some practice model:

  5. #4
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    To my regret I do not know if the fuze is an exact copy as I have no info at all about the russian fuze. It may however be a 1:1 copy as it is not smart to change a good working concept. I would be most intetrested to know.
    Looking for / Suche noch:
    -8,8cm Pzgr.40.
    -8,8cm D (drahtsperre)

  6. #5
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    Hi
    (sorry for my English)
    Quote Originally Posted by pzgr40 View Post
    The M38/M40,
    A smaller version of the ball shaped clusterbombs. The bomblet is also rotation armed. 950 pcs. these bomblets were packed in the warhead of the Lance missile.
    Diameter: 45 mm
    No further info about grenade or fuze is available. The M38/M40 in the picture is a dummy.
    On the Ordata website and in the book "Antipersonnel Weapons" I found a little more info about M38/M40. BTW Ordata claims that diameter is 43 mm. Total weight 136 g, explosive weight 27 g (Comp.B). According to AW book M38 has an impact fuze, M40 random delay fuze. Moreover, in Ordata site are drawings of M40 with M219 and M219E1 fuze. This could confirm what you write above, that M219 was a random delay time fuze.
    Quote Originally Posted by pzgr40 View Post
    The blue dummy is of an unknown type designation , however of US manufacturing
    Diameter: 48 mm
    On Ordata is mentioned such thing as M32 grenade. Diameter:48 mm, total weight 204 g, explosive weight 42 g (Comp.B). Unfortunately, no info about fuze. On the application list are Honest John artillery rocket and SUU-24 and SUU-30-family dispensers. In fact I never hear before about any cluster bomb with M32 grenades.
    Last edited by Speedy; 5th October 2010 at 03:44 PM.

  7. #6
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    Hi, Thanks for posting the pictures and information. I have seen the final picture (in your original posting) appear in a number of places and purported to be a number of things. However, it is in the Borden Institute Book as a Honest John carrying M139 bomblets (http://www.bordeninstitute.army.mil/...g_115-154.pdf; Page 9/40)....what is correct? Any comments gratefully received.

  8. #7
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    It's an M190 warhead for the Honest John system.
    Filled with 368 GB filled M139 submunitions
    ANY LIVE OR DUD ORDNANCE POSTED BY ME HAS BEEN DISPOSED OF BY EOD PERSONNEL

  9. #8
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    You are both absolutely right. I forgot to take away the wrong picture on this forum. However , if I take it away now it will disturb the "fabric" of the posting.
    Here the correct ammunition for this warhead.
    http://www.wk2ammo.com/showthread.php?t=5162

    Regards, DJH
    Last edited by pzgr40; 5th October 2010 at 08:44 PM.
    Looking for / Suche noch:
    -8,8cm Pzgr.40.
    -8,8cm D (drahtsperre)

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy View Post
    Hi
    (sorry for my English)


    On the Ordata website and in the book "Antipersonnel Weapons" I found a little more info about M38/M40. BTW Ordata claims that diameter is 43 mm. Total weight 136 g, explosive weight 27 g (Comp.B). According to AW book M38 has an impact fuze, M40 random delay fuze. Moreover, in Ordata site are drawings of M40 with M219 and M219E1 fuze. This could confirm what you write above, that M219 was a random delay time fuze.

    On Ordata is mentioned such thing as M32 grenade. Diameter:48 mm, total weight 204 g, explosive weight 42 g (Comp.B). Unfortunately, no info about fuze. On the application list are Honest John artillery rocket and SUU-24 and SUU-30-family dispensers. In fact I never hear before about any cluster bomb with M32 grenades.


    I believe you have it backwards, the M40 was impact and the M38 was random delay. A lot of the references for submunitions are less than accurate.

    DJ, my data does not show the golfball type submunitions being carried in the Lance missile, though they were in numerous rocket warheads and may have been in the Bullpup missile.

    M38s, M40s and M32s could be either dispenser dropped or released from warheads. The MK5 Mod 0 dispenser (MK 15 cluster) carried 2020 M40s, or 2020 M38s as the MK22 cluster (Sadeye). The SUU-30 carried 2025. My favorite is the SUU-24, it carried 38,520. The Honest John submunition warhead carried 4800 of the M38/M40 or 3093 of the M32.

    The M32 used the M212 fuze, the M38 used the M218 fuze and the M40 used either the M219 or the M291E1 fuze. The M219 series is impact only. The M218 has an internal sack filled with viscous fluid, when the fluid is forced out it fires.

    Here are some of my golfball variations, plus my Honest John submunition warhead - behind the other little pieces..
    Attached Images Attached Images
    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

  11. #10
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    Hi
    Quote Originally Posted by US-Subs View Post
    I believe you have it backwards, the M40 was impact and the M38 was random delay.
    Of course you are right. My mistake, sorry.

    Quote Originally Posted by US-Subs View Post
    DJ, my data does not show the golfball type submunitions being carried in the Lance missile, though they were in numerous rocket warheads and may have been in the Bullpup missile.
    According to "Anti-personnel Weapons" book, Lance warhead carried 860 BLU-63. Bullpup carried unspecified number of BLU-26. There's also mentioned Little John cluster warhead, with unknown number of M38/M40.

 

 
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