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  1. #1
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    47x137 Driggs Infantry gun

    Hello

    I have hulse 47x137R with stamps "Driggs & Ecoxxxxxx, USA"

    Such companies Driggs Cannon was at the contest inPoland at infantry guns. PL bought one this gun. I'm looking forinformation about this gunand info/drawings ammunition. This is serial production?

    Thanks
    drigs.jpg

  2. #2
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    When was this ? Are you certain this is not 37mm. Driggs merged with Savage Arms during WW1 and I doubt could have taken part in 1920s trials ????

  3. #3
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    Hulse is at 100% - 47x137R.

    In 1925 Poland bought four guns - 47mm Beardmore, 47mm Bofors, 47mm Driggs and St. Chamond for 112.000 zł.
    Tested this in Poland, and selected Driggs and Beardmore. In 1928 Poland ordered three guns Beardmore and three Driggs. Because faults Driggs cannons that had to be returned for repair to the US, comparative trials are not held. Driggs cannons had to retur to the Polish in February 1929, but it is not known thether this happened.
    Its all...

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    The 47mm was called a 3 pounder in the US Navy. They were obsolete before WW1 and by the 1920's were used only on small craft like Coast Guard vessels. Many were sold as salvage, and i would guess someone fixed up one of these scrapped 3 pounders on a field carriage and was trying to sell them to unsuspecting buyers. This was quite a common thing to do in the arms trade and probably still is. This would likely explain the failure of the sasmple weapon during the trials. As GSpragge has said, Driggs Ordnance was bought up by Savage Arms during WW1 so would have been out of bussiness by the 1920's.Interesting story here. I don't believe that 3 pounder cases are too common, so you have a nice case there.

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    Lasr line in my previous post should have stated"Driggs 3 pounder cases are too common".

  6. #6
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    I don't believe this is a normal 3 pounder case. A few years ago I was able to take pictures of a case like this. I had doubts it could be a cut of and as you can see it has been forced on the neck. Przemek has the same case so ....too much for a coincident ?442 Driggs base.jpg443 Driggs.jpg

  7. #7
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    highlandotter - Thanks for info !
    Quote Originally Posted by highlandotter View Post
    Interesting story here. I don't believe that 3 pounder cases are too common, so you have a nice case there.
    Yes it's very interesting, this case have Polish stamp.


    Quote Originally Posted by Western View Post
    I don't believe this is a normal 3 pounder case. A few years ago I was able to take pictures of a case like this. I had doubts it could be a cut of and as you can see it has been forced on the neck. Przemek has the same case so ....too much for a coincident ?
    It's the same, thanks for photos ! Neck is fatal condition, but i measured the in optimum height [not deformated] and I think its x137mm. 47mm driggs łuska.jpg

  8. #8
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    If Driggs was still operating (as a subsidiary of Savage) I do wonder what they were selling or trying to sell. And how much longer they lasted ----

  9. #9
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    William H Driggs was a US Navy officer who designed a number of improvements to rapid-firing guns starting in the early 1890s. By 1900 he had 15 patents for both complete guns and components, such as sights, mounts and breeches, along with one for a “banding shell”. He also had one patent jointly with his younger brother Louis (also an engineer), and one for a sliding breech mechanism jointly with Seaton Schroeder. On his retirement from the Navy he manufactured some guns, mostly 3-inch and Driggs-Schroeder 6pdr, on his own as the Driggs-Seabury Gun & Ammunition Company, and licensed the designs out to other manufacturers as well. The USN bought 259 and the Army 41 Driggs-Schroeder guns through 1909, and license-built 125 1pdr and 112 3-inch guns at the Washington Navy Yard.


    His complete guns appear to have fallen out of favor with the introduction of the M1900-1903 series of guns, although some of his components continued to be used, and in 1902 the company barely escaped bankruptcy. In 1908 William Driggs died. Thus, by the time WW I came around Driggs-Seabury was primarily manufacturing smaller weapons, in particular Lewis MGs under license for Britain and Canada. This brought sufficient prosperty that in 1915 they acquired a majority interest in Savage Arms of Utica NY, although they chose to use the Savage name after that time.


    In the meantime many of William's patents had passed by will to his younger brother Louis. Louis had not given up on the artillery side of the family business and to that end formed the Driggs Ordnance and Engineering Company, unrelated to the earlier Driggs-Seabury. Louis pinned his hopes on utilizing the Driggs systems to create a modern 3-inch anti-aircraft gun. Unfortunately, by the time he was ready to launch his project the war had ended, leaving the victors with huge stocks of weapons of all descriptions.


    With very little money and no useable manufacturing capacity he launched two sales drives in 1928: one to Turkey for the 3-in AA gun, and one to Poland for the AA gun and a 47mm infantry accompanying gun. The Poles decided they did not have the money for the 3-inch, but did place an order for 3 infantry guns for trials purposes. The Driggs sales representative in Constantinople then told the Turks that Driggs had secured a contract from Poland for guns and that he would permit them to take advantage of the fact that Driggs was right now in full-scale production. He neglected to mention that the sale was only for three small guns. The Turks were wowed and signed a provisional contract for about 70 guns for $3.2 million. Unfortunately, they required a $240,000 performance bond.


    The firm was unable to come up with the money and the contract revoked and went to Vickers instead. Shortly thereafter, having almost succeeded, the Driggs Ordnance & Engineering Co folded up.

    It is really cool that you came up with a round for this very rare weapon.

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Firebird For This Useful Post:

    Gspragge (20th November 2011), HAZORD (22nd November 2011), Przemek (24th November 2011)

  11. #10
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    As a follow-on to my prior post, further research indicates that the Driggs Ordnance & Engineering Co proposed a hybrid mortar-howitzer in 3-in and 4-in caliber that was apparently trialled by the US Army in 1935. The firm was still in existence in 1937, when the Brazilian government inquired of the US Army about their standing. Apparently Driggs proposed building an arsenal in Brazil (presumably with Brazilian funding). The War Department replied that they had no knowledge whatsoever of Drigg's finances and that no Driggs guns were in service at that time, aside from a small number of Driggs-Seabury guns in coastal batteries that were being withdrawn as obsolete. In 1938 they were still marketing a variety of guns, including mountain guns, 37mm AT guns, 47mm infantry guns and their mortar/howitzer. So apparently Louis was a scrapper, or at least a dreamer.

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Firebird For This Useful Post:

    Przemek (24th November 2011), Western (21st November 2011)

 

 
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