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  1. #1
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    3" Experimental ???

    Hi i am looking for the information on this cut down it was handed to a chap at rosyth naval dock yard years ago...... I think ? please correct me here if i am wrong a part of an Experimental 3 inch british rapid fire project like the oto melara
    i really want to understand all the head stamp markings and if was the failed Experiment ? its brass and has been cut in a machine shop very tidy.... the chap told me a few were handed out some engraved . but with what i dont know ?
    its nothing like my 3" L/70 headstamp .
    I am not even sure if its naval

    thanks ken
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  2. #2
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    It does say 3" 70. The 3"70 Cal was a Naval round. The U.S. had guns on a couple of Aircraft Carriers, but it wasn't used very much and was phased out. What is the diameter across the widest part of the rim?
    Last edited by HAZORD; 12th May 2013 at 03:53 AM.
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  3. #3
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    Unsurprisingly the Parent Number (873) on the design number D2/L/ 8161/E/873 decodes to

    "Cartridge, QF, 3-inch, 70 Cals, Case, Empty"

    D2/L/ identifies one of about ten drawing offices that were involved in munitions design. Prior to this system, which was adopted late in WW2, design drawings for munitions were prefixed with the Design Department's identifier DD(L). D2 covered projectiles and cartridge cases and some fuzes for all services (also dealt with bombs, mortar bombs, demolition stores etc). D2/L/ became S1 in the 1950s.

    8161 is the serial number of the design drawing

    E indicates that the drawing is for an empty store

    873 is the Parent Number. This was introduced to associate a design with a particular project which often consisted of numerous parts ( although not in this case).
    Last edited by Bonnex; 12th May 2013 at 09:46 AM. Reason: Decode of the stampings
    N.


  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bonnex For This Useful Post:

    ken68 (12th May 2013), ydnum303 (13th May 2013)

  5. #4
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    Hi mate thankyou for that information wow thats not a straight forward one . the rim is 114mm. so was this more like a template for the 76.2/50 vickers naval x 613r ? 114mm rim ....

    thankyou again for that ive looked for ages for info on this base ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnex View Post
    Unsurprisingly the Parent Number (873) on the design number D2/L/ 8161/E/873 decodes to

    "Cartridge, QF, 3-inch, 70 Cals, Case, Empty"

    D2/L/ identifies one of about ten drawing offices that were involved in munitions design. Prior to this system, which was adopted late in WW2, design drawings for munitions were prefixed with the Design Department's identifier DD(L). D2 covered projectiles and cartridge cases and some fuzes for all services (also dealt with bombs, mortar bombs, demolition stores etc). D2/L/ became S1 in the 1950s.

    8161 is the serial number of the design drawing

    E indicates that the drawing is for an empty store

    873 is the Parent Number. This was introduced to associate a design with a particular project which often consisted of numerous parts ( although not in this case).

 

 

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