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  1. #1
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    .30 Springfield gallery practice / Guard ammunition bullet type

    see the attached photos of a round that I picked up today. The round is a normal .30 Springfield with the headstamp reading 'W.R.A.Co 30 G. 1903'.

    I am uncertain whether the G stands for gallery practice or Guard (or both). But it is the bullet that puzzles me as I thought these would be lead bullets not a round nosed FMJ. It is possible that someone has swopped bullets at some point of course. Anyone any thoughts?

    And is the '1903' date the actual date or the model number?

    many thanks

    Dave
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    That's a 30-03, not a 30-06. 'G" stands for Government. The bullet is a 220 grain CN.

    The Cal .30 Model 1903 was adopted in July 1903 as the US standard for the new Springfield M1903 rifle. The cartridge that you have is a contract round manufactured by Winchester Repeating Arms Co. The M1903 was replaced by the M1906 in October 1906, although the rifle retained the same M1903 designation. The M1906 has a shorter case neck and a lighter (150 grain) CN bullet.

    Your cartridge is not rare but is not too common either.

    Ray
    Last edited by raymeketa; 23rd August 2014 at 05:38 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by raymeketa View Post
    That's a 30-03, not a 30-06. 'G" stands for Government. The bullet is a 220 grain CN.

    The Cal .30 Model 1903 was adopted in July 1903 as the US standard for the new Springfield M1903 rifle. The cartridge that you have is a contract round manufactured by Winchester Repeating Arms Co. The M1903 was replaced by the M1906 in October 1906, although the rifle retained the same M1903 designation. The M1906 has a shorter case neck and a lighter (150 grain) CN bullet.

    Your cartridge is not rare but is not too common either.

    Ray
    many thanks Ray for a comprehensive reply. I'm a lot wiser now than I was a few minutes ago!

    kind regards, dave

 

 

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