Welcome to the Inert Ordnance Collectors.
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 71 Times in 24 Posts
    Hi Gr.Fr.!
    It's always nice not being alone in this thread. Post, whatever looks uncommon!
    Your fuze is in a really nice condition: It's the inner wooden part of a fuze that was used for petards to break passages into frozen rivers. That's all I can contribute.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to nachtwuenscher For This Useful Post:

    Gr.Fr (10th January 2019), Sprockets (26th January 2019)

  3. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Preussen
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 23 Times in 8 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by nachtwuenscher View Post
    Hi Gr.Fr.!
    It's always nice not being alone in this thread. Post, whatever looks uncommon!
    Your fuze is in a really nice condition: It's the inner wooden part of a fuze that was used for petards to break passages into frozen rivers. That's all I can contribute.
    Hi,nachtwuenscher!
    Thank you)) So we assumed)))
    Here is my small collection of Prussian fuses) But there are no such experimental ones as yours

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Gr.Fr For This Useful Post:

    DICKAREN (11th January 2019)

  5. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 71 Times in 24 Posts
    This time I can show you only half a fuze -whoever knows how the other half might have looked like or can even put a name on this piece will be thanked more than the thank-button is able to thank.
    The fuze itself has two time rings from 0-315 (numbers from 10 - 310, might be hm or 1/10th of a second or whatever), It seems to be manufactured in 1888 (there is an 88 stamped into one of the fuze setting grooves. The stem in the lower part seems to contain a needle like it was used in Doppelzdr c/91 and later. The top part resembles the old Fedlschrapnellzünder series with the minor difference that the massive (bolt) Schlagstück is secured only by two delicate copper sheets that could be bent easily even at low muzzle velocity - so maybe it was used on some kind of mortar shells.
    DSCF9099.jpgDSCF9100.jpgDSCF9101.jpgDSCF9102.jpgDSCF9103.jpg

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to nachtwuenscher For This Useful Post:

    Bellifortis (4th September 2019), DICKAREN (4th September 2019)

 

 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top