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  1. #21
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    If the plug with the square hole is a fuze-plug, then the item was not fired, but dumped or lost at sea.
    Bellifortis

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bellifortis View Post
    If the plug with the square hole is a fuze-plug, then the item was not fired, but dumped or lost at sea.
    Bellifortis
    the photos I posted earlier were plugs taken from fired projectiles.
    I think the fact that this was recovered from an area of sea where guns were trained on,would raise the probability that it was
    fired from the gunnery school,but of course it could have been dumped as you say.
    For practice firing,could they not have fired some without fuzes inserted,as with the RML shells that were fired on another
    range near to Plymouth also?
    Tim.

  3. #23
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    Very, very unlikely. I've never heard of fireworks shells being used in practice firings. Even in a ranging shot one would use a fuzed shell so one could observe the exact spot where it landed. The most likely reason for finding a fuze-plugged fireworks shell in the sea, is dumping or loss.
    Bellifortis.
    Quote Originally Posted by mach1bang View Post
    the photos I posted earlier were plugs taken from fired projectiles.
    I think the fact that this was recovered from an area of sea where guns were trained on,would raise the probability that it was
    fired from the gunnery school,but of course it could have been dumped as you say.
    For practice firing,could they not have fired some without fuzes inserted,as with the RML shells that were fired on another
    range near to Plymouth also?
    Tim.

  4. #24
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    Hi there,
    I forwarded the photos to someone who study's early ordnance for his opinion,and he gave me the following
    info and drawing.He is confident that it is an RML 6.6" howitzer mk11 star shell.Approved in November1882,
    formally introduced into service in January 1883.
    So if he is correct now we know.
    Tim.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to mach1bang For This Useful Post:

    Bellifortis (12th December 2016), copdoc (11th December 2016), SG500 (10th December 2016)

  6. #25
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    Herewith, documentation on 6.6in Mk IV star shell (books from 1893 to 1899)

    66.jpg66 2.jpg66 3.jpg15s.jpg




    And early version (no Mk, no diagram, book from 1886)

    1886.jpg
    Last edited by MINENAZ16; 11th December 2016 at 09:23 AM.
    Any Live or Dug ordnance shown by me has been disposed of by EOD personnel .

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    mach1bang (11th December 2016), Michel (11th December 2016), Spgr30 (11th December 2016)

  8. #26
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    Thanks Minenaz 16,Bellifortis,and others who have shown an interest in this thread.
    Tim.

  9. #27
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    http://www.cyber-heritage.co.uk/rock...et/rockets.htm

    RIFLE MUZZLE LOADING R.M.L. ILLUMINATING STAR SHELLS


    The "Shell, R.M.L., Filled Star, 8-inch, Mark IV-Spherical" is NOT a cannon ball but a shell??!! This image is from 1902. These are fired from howitzers rather than mortars. Their calibres are 8, 6.6 and 6.3 inch. No bursting charge is needed as the expanding gases from the burning stars is sufficient to break the shell open. Up to 31 stars could be carried. Having no parachute these stars would fall to ground faster and be less prone to wind drift. The "Shell R.M.L. Star 7pr. Mark VI"was a proper studded artillery projectile and shells such as this in a variety of calibres would be fired from a rifled gun for extended range and accuracy. This example would have 4 large stars in it.This is a 1902 image.

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    mach1bang (12th December 2016)

  11. #28
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    I noticed as well a spherical star shell for RML 6.3in with same construction.

    6.3IN DOC.jpg6333.jpg
    Any Live or Dug ordnance shown by me has been disposed of by EOD personnel .

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    mach1bang (12th December 2016)

 

 
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