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  1. #1
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    G.A.R. Projectile - what is it?

    Helping to sort out and pack up the ammunition collection at the Firepower Museum at Woolwich Arsenal this week, we came across a batch of projectiles in their launch tubes, which has baffled everyone The projectiles are 70mm dia x 500mm long and the 'launch' tube is the same length with a wall thickness of about 1.5mm - 2.0mm. No documentation available in the catalogue! Photos are attached and we would be very pleased for any help in their identification or any other clues or information. Many thanks, Depotman

    GAR 1.jpgGAR 2.jpgGAR 3.jpgGAR 4.jpgGAR 5.jpgGAR 6.jpg

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Depotman For This Useful Post:

    AMMOTECHXT (22nd June 2016), beihan62 (23rd June 2016), SG500 (22nd June 2016), TimG (22nd June 2016)

  3. #2
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    I'm thinking it's a type of rocket, as the diagram shows a venturi, presumably each has more than one venturi? The copper tube with holes in it and the green coloured part of the diagram may be propellant and the means of initiating it, to launch the rocket from the steel tube, perhaps electrically, via the hole in the base end of the tube. The diagram shows a weak link between the copper tube and base of the `rocket', probably meaning that it is designed to break off at some point. I'm guessing that the blue colour in the diagram is propellant, to maintain or increase the flight speed; the yellow could be HE filling and the fuze appears to be a mid 20th century shape, assuming that it is British. Photo 3 shows what might be an obturating band, similar in principle to mortar ammo. Perhaps a number of the steel tubes containing rockets were designed to be loaded into a weapon for multiple firings. None of my copies of the 1874, 1902, 1915, 1926 and 1936 British ammo publications shows anything quite the same. For increased accuracy each rocket would need to spin in flight. Interesting and thanks for showing it.
    Any live or dug ordnance shown in my posts has been dealt with accordingly by eod personel

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    It is probably a 'Z' Battery projectile. Rather than sending multiple high velocity shells at a fleet of aircraft, the idea of sending a battery of low velocity HE shells into the sky, all at the same time was tried.
    I only ever heard about them and I think it was not much of a success, so was quietly phased out quite early in WWII.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMMOTECHXT View Post
    I'm thinking it's a type of rocket, as the diagram shows a venturi, presumably each has more than one venturi? The copper tube with holes in it and the green coloured part of the diagram may be propellant and the means of initiating it, to launch the rocket from the steel tube, perhaps electrically, via the hole in the base end of the tube. The diagram shows a weak link between the copper tube and base of the `rocket', probably meaning that it is designed to break off at some point. I'm guessing that the blue colour in the diagram is propellant, to maintain or increase the flight speed; the yellow could be HE filling and the fuze appears to be a mid 20th century shape, assuming that it is British. Photo 3 shows what might be an obturating band, similar in principle to mortar ammo. Perhaps a number of the steel tubes containing rockets were designed to be loaded into a weapon for multiple firings. None of my copies of the 1874, 1902, 1915, 1926 and 1936 British ammo publications shows anything quite the same. For increased accuracy each rocket would need to spin in flight. Interesting and thanks for showing it.
    Thanks for your thoughts and question - I should have mentioned that there are three venturi rocket nozzles which are slightly angled to impart spin after firing from it's smooth-bore tube. Depotman

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  7. #5
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    No trace in publication "British Rocket Stores 1946."

    TimG

  8. #6
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    Looks very much like the US 70mm rockets previously discussed.

    http://www.bocn.co.uk/vbforum/thread...highlight=70mm
    All dug or live ordnance shown in my posts is under EOD control and has been or will be dealt with accordingly by EOD personnel

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  10. #7
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    Thanks to US-Subs's input -

    Gun Assisted Rocket Projectile http://discovery.nationalarchives.go...ails/r/C634723

    TimG

    Also - http://discovery.nationalarchives.go...ils/r/C1341113
    Last edited by TimG; 22nd June 2016 at 11:30 PM.

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Depotman View Post
    Thanks for your thoughts and question - I should have mentioned that there are three venturi rocket nozzles which are slightly angled to impart spin after firing from it's smooth-bore tube. Depotman
    Looking at US-Subs link it seems most likely that the raised band on the body was likely to have been engraved by rifling of a barrel to impart spin during launch. This would further improve accuracy. The canted nozzles of the venturi would then maintain accuracy in flight.
    Any live or dug ordnance shown in my posts has been dealt with accordingly by eod personel

  12. #9
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    Many thanks to all who replied. It looks like G.A.R. stands for "Gun Assisted Rocket" (thanks Tim G) and the project is similar to a USA project based on a 70mm Rocket and probably from about 1957. If anything else comes up I'll add a follow-up post. Depotman.

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Depotman View Post
    Many thanks to all who replied. It looks like G.A.R. stands for "Gun Assisted Rocket" (thanks Tim G) and the project is similar to a USA project based on a 70mm Rocket and probably from about 1957. If anything else comes up I'll add a follow-up post. Depotman.
    Sorry this is a very late addition and apologies that it is light on information but you can deduce that it is British, drawn in the S1 Drawing Office at ARDE (before it became RARDE).

    S1-xxxx1aReduced3.jpg
    N.


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