Welcome to the Inert Ordnance Collectors.
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: 6.5x50 ID

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,455
    Thanks
    412
    Thanked 560 Times in 314 Posts
    A couple of pics of my Solothurn round. Note that the bullet has a more noticeable join between the ogive and the shank by comparison with a Type 38.
    P1020385.jpgP1020389.jpg

  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Betws-y-Coed, North Wales
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 81 Times in 71 Posts
    Thanks for posting the pics Tony, that's certainly an unusual headstamp and a very strange bullet. I have a 7mm Mauser made by Solothurn and the 'S' has exactly the same distinctive serifs. I can't think who this cartridge could have been made for - are you able to post this on the IAA forum?
    Jim

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,455
    Thanks
    412
    Thanked 560 Times in 314 Posts
    Will do.
    I notice that the rim is thicker and has a more square section as well.

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    362
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 64 Times in 43 Posts
    Ken Elks has the round documented in his book on Japanese ammo, but there is no mention of why or for whom.
    I can't recall my reasoning, but I have my example cataloged as a "Swiss experimental". That info might have come along with the round when I got it a few years back at SLICS.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to jonnyc For This Useful Post:

    Tony Williams (18th August 2016)

  6. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,455
    Thanks
    412
    Thanked 560 Times in 314 Posts
    For those who don't have Ken's books, he says this:

    "6.5mm Arisaka cartridges were also manufactured using cases made by Schweizerische Metallwerke Selve & Co, of Thun, Switzerland. These use the manufacturer's code letter S and are dated to 1921. These have a distinctive, almost spire-pointed, bullet with cupro-nickel-clad steel jacket. The bullet is fairly standard, 138 grains, and the propellant is 32 grains of grey nitro-cellulose flake."


  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Tony Williams For This Useful Post:

    sksvlad (18th August 2016)

 

 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top