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  1. #1
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    8,8cm SprGr43 for KwK43 and Pak.43

    Cutaway model of a high explosive shell for the 88x822R KwK43 gun. The KwK43 gun was used in the PzKw.VI Ausf.B (kingtiger) , the Nashorn and , Elephant and Jagdpanther tank destroyers. It was the most powerfull tank gun used in WW2 and was able to penetrate all armour the allies had to offer at long range. As the projectiles had a flat trajectory the gunner could aim and shoot without elevation corrections the first 1000 yards (914 mtrs).

    The projectile is made of mild steel , forged and machined into shape.
    This projectile has wide drivingbands, although the gun was designed to use the small drivingbands flak 41 projectiles (see table picture 03). After 500 shots fired the wide drivingbads were used due to barrel wear. This means the gunner had to keep track of how many shots were fired.
    However; offer a collector a Kwk43 shellcase with a narrow drivingbands HE or APHE projectile and most collectors will tell you this is a wrong combination, although small drivingbands is also correct. Projectiles with thinner drivingbelts were marked with four white longitudal stripes on the projectile body divided over the circumference to mark they were to be used in guns with less than 500 shots fired.

    The projectile is fuzed with the AZ23/28 Pr. As the AZ 23 was made for low speed shells, the AZ23/28 designed for high speed shells had exactly the same design, exept for the leaf spring surrounding the centrifugal weights that was thicker and opened at a higher rotation speed, avoiding the fuze from arming while in the barrel.
    The fuze exists of a steel skeleton filled and surrounded with Bakelite. This was done to replace strategic materials for fuzes like aluminium and brass that were scarce during ww2 in Germany. Functioning of the fuze: after firing the centrifugal weights between the firing pin and the firing cap block are thrown outward , thereby releasing both. These two parts are held apart by a spring. The screw in the side can be rotated 90 degrees, thereby enabling the plate in the central firing channel to move out and open the central flame channel, giving no delay, or shut, and force the flame of the firing cap over the 0,15 sec delay channel. At impact the wooden hammer pin forces the firing pin in the firing cap. If the shell glances off a target , the firing cap block moves forward into the firing pin, caused by the negative acceleration. The flame reaches the black powder magazine, which ignites the detonator and the booster, exploding the main charge.

    The flame of the fuze ignites the Gr.Zdldg. Np10, which ignites the main charge.
    A smoke box is placed in the base of the explosive charge, marking the place of impact when the projectile explodes.

    The shellcase 6388St is steel made, brass plated and filled with 3,1 kg Digl. R.P –G1- 700/650 – 6/4,5 powdercharge, meaning 3,1 kg Diglykol RohrPulver (Diglycol Powder Sticks) type G1, lengths 700mm (core) and 650mm (side) , 6mm in diameter with a hole of 4,5 mm through. A bag of fine powder is sewed to the base of the powderbag housing the sticks to instantaniously ignite the main charge.

    In Picture 2 the SprGr. And the Pzgr. are pictured side by side.

    Length of the SprGr.43 : 1160mm
    Length of the Pzgr.39/43 : 1120mm
    Length of shellcase : 822mm


    Regards, DJH
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by pzgr40; 15th July 2017 at 09:12 PM.

  2. The Following 14 Users Say Thank You to pzgr40 For This Useful Post:

    Andysarmoury (16th July 2017), Darren (15th July 2017), Fusse2004 (15th July 2017), greif (15th July 2017), HAZORD (15th July 2017), Ivashkin (15th July 2017), MINENAZ16 (16th July 2017), Nabob (21st July 2017), no3nh4 (16th July 2017), RichardB (15th July 2017), SG500 (15th July 2017), tnor_fr (16th July 2017), trrrr (17th July 2017), waffenamt (17th July 2017)

  3. #2
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    Absolutely awesome work as always !!
    thank you for sharing


  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RichardB For This Useful Post:

    pzgr40 (15th July 2017), thekees (15th July 2017), waffenamt (17th July 2017)

  5. #3
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    Excellent job DJ! How many rounds could be fired in the King Tiger barrel before it needed to be replaced?
    ___HAZ/
    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
    ________Saving Lives Through Education

  6. #4
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    According to the "Datenblatter fur Heeres waffen gerat" blatt G61 a barrel life is apprxomately 2000 rounds, but is also states at 1200 rounds when using the Pzgr.39/1.
    So I think firing armour piercing shells only -which have a much more powerfull propelling charge, and thus higher pressure- will wear out the barrel faster. Also take into account that the bourelet (the forward part of the projectile gliding over the lands in the barrel) is much harder with AP shells than with HE shells, so this also will increase barrel wear.

    Regards, DJH

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to pzgr40 For This Useful Post:

    HAZORD (16th July 2017), RichardB (16th July 2017)

 

 

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