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  1. #11
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    they probably found that the red lettering on the brown lacquered case was very hard to read so changed to yellow to make it easier to see.

  2. #12
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    The TM-9 1905 ammunition renovation manual is a must for collectors. Does this French company do PayPal.

  3. #13
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    You could cut your own stencils, takes time but very satisfying and means things like lot numbers wont be the same as other peoples. Look at Rickoshea's posts and his are all hand done, including the ammo collection he restored that belongs to Bovington tank museum, very impressive indeed!
    Always seeking British flares.

  4. #14
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    Hi May I ask what item you need to stencil ?

    1 One of my jobs at the depot was to cut stencil

    So I may be able to help you


    Steve

  5. #15
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    Hi Steve,
    Do you know what material is or was used by the MoD for making stencils (acetate or some sort of waterproof paper?).
    I'm about to embark on a stencilling project on a replica WW1 ammo box, and am unsure what would be the best material to use for cutting my own stencils. (I've copied them from an original box).
    I'll be using a stipple brush to apply the paint. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance!
    Dyl

  6. #16
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    When I was involved in re-enactments I made lots of different stencils by the following methods.

    Photocopying the original article if it was flat and not too heavy for the copier, encapsulate the copy, then cut out the lettering with a scalpel type craft knife.

    Making up the artwork on a computer, printing and encapsulating, then cutting out the letters.

    Tracing onto acetate, (overhead projector film), enlarging the tracing on a photocopier, tidying up the lettering, reducing back to correct size on the photocopier, encapsulating, cutting out lettering.

    For the stippling, I used the sponge side of a small washing up sponge, (the scrubbing side adds some rigidity to the sponge. You can get packets of 10 - 15 sponges in most pound stores, so they are cheap enough to throw away after each job.

    Use paint that is slightly dry, or thick. Old paint often works well if it has not discoloured in the tin.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to reccetrooper For This Useful Post:

    starshell (4th September 2017)

  8. #17
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    heres what ive been doing for stencil reproduction.go to a graphic designer,signwriter or similar and take them a photocopy of what you want and they make it on this film.you peel off the back and stick it in place,then peel off the front and pick out the small centers of the letters the spray or brush to suit
    very easy to use and you can have it made exactly the right style of lettering
    it will stick to painted,varnished wood and metal no problem
    Attached Images Attached Images

 

 
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