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  1. #1
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    2.75 inch FFAR w/ 17 pdr warhead, 1974

    Recent addition. I have seen all types over the years, but noticed this one is different. It came with the fibre containers for both the warhead and the motor and the rather uncommon M229 HE warhead. The warhead is 26 inches long, and the rocket assembled stands at 66 inches tall. The M229 warhead is marked " MIS 12-28 74 2.75 IN HE FFAR" and "AH". No mention of
    M229. See pics.
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  2. #2
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    When you say "marked", is the ID stamped into the top half of the body, or is the ID inked on?
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    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
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  3. #3
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    The markings are stamped in the metal at the base ( attachment threads). See pics.
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  4. #4
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    I'm not sure of the exact reason that the Model number is left off of the three sizes of HE warheads as a stamping into the metal. The 6.5, 10, and 17 Lb. warheads have their model numbers ink stenciled on in yellow letters if they are HE loaded, on an OD body, with a yellow band extending about an inch down the body from the fuze well. The 17 Lb. M229 warheads produce interesting UXB's. If they hit the ground at a certain angle, and the fuze fails to function, the warheads sometime break in half cleanly right at the joint in the middle, leaving an open-ended cylinder full of comp B4 that is attached to the motor tube, and the top half with dud fuze on the nose and the base open with exposed comp B4. Sometimes the 10 Lb. warhead bodies break apart cleanly from the threaded bases, leaving a 3 inch threaded cup full of explosive attached to the motor body and an open bottom main body full of explosive.

    From this observation, I've concluded that the top half is the body of the M151 10 Lb. HE warhead that hasn't had the threaded base attached. It seems to be manufactured in three separate parts, most likely pearlitic maleable iron. If the threaded base is attached to the top half, it makes an M151. If the bottom half, which resembles a pipe has a threaded base attached, and the top half attached, it becomes am M229. My theory is that they are made in three parts to produce the castings more efficiently. I'm not sure how they are attached, if it is a press fit or heat shrink, or something else but there doesn't seem to be any solder remnants at the joints. Sometimes, range fires ignite the exposed explosive which burns out, leaving the three empty pieces.

    They might not stamp the Model numbers in the body, so they are free to swap parts around.
    ___HAZ/
    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
    ________Saving Lives Through Education

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to HAZORD For This Useful Post:

    917601 (15th February 2018), GTR003121 (31st August 2018)

 

 

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