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  1. #21
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    You may have also noticed in the first display cabinet photo, middle / 2nd shelf down, extreme RHS standing vertical is the very rare Spring Pistol mechanism!!!

    This is only the 2nd one I.m aware of.
    Cheers
    D

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sksvlad View Post
    Attachment 141825Attachment 141826

    I had no idea Austria had a Navy!!!!
    An officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy conceived the idea of the modern torpedo and sought assistance from Robert Whitehead who eventually produced a working torpedo. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Luppis

  4. #23
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    It may interest the members of this forum to know that according to Treasury documents I just found in my stash (happens more than you'd think), the British torpedo net cutter variant was patented (no.7854) in 1892 by the head of the Vernon school, Arthur 'Tug' Wilson (noted as Sans Pareil on the paperwork because he'd just been reassigned).
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    Last edited by Ben Turnbull; 17th May 2018 at 09:21 PM.

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  6. #24
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    Hello, Ben,

    Incredible-You have found a Secret Patent-I do not know if drawings are attached, or whether they are separate. I found a Secret patent by Major Sadd, Porton Down, regarding the British Gas Mask Canister used in WW2-Unusual reason for it being secret. Unfortunately, although they were supposed to be printed after a period, this rarely happened. The Bouncing Bomb patent was an exception! see my PM.

  7. #25
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    Hello, Drew,
    I believe you know Denis in Melbourne-he admires your tenacity! I sometimes wonder if the earlier Whitehead Pistols had a blocking safety device, operated from the propellor drive, so that, should a torpedo launched from an Underwater Broadside Tube become partially launched, due to a propulsion failure, then it would remain unarmed. When a Nose Propellor for arming was introduced, without the high drag external connection of the original system, presumably the water operated Locking Flap for the Arming Propellor was expected to take care of this situation, so that water flow transverse to the torpedo would not turn the propellor?

    You show the Jutland Museums Scissor cutter-perhaps Japanese? Also you mention a real rarity-A "Spring Operated" Pistol-Swedish? Do you mean the Duplex Pistol that was used for British WW2 Torp., which, as it swivelled on impact, eliminated the bulky Inertia Pistol used by the States and others! The Jutland Museum items probably came from the most fantastic ordnance collection I have ever seen, which was housed at Christiana, adjacent to the commune. Everything demonstrated, and a curator-EODTIC, who knew every item backwards. When he was forced to retire, it was broken up, nobody knew what had happened and I believe Natter may have tracked down its remains, sadly no longer protected from the elements to an extent. Even had a british Gas mine from WW1, not mentioned in Admiralty history. Congratulations on, I believe, persuding the authorities in Fiume-sorry, Rijeka in Croatia, to look after their rusting exhibits!.

  8. #26
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    Thanks, Lefa,for that most helpful translation covering the Bellemo explosively augmented cutter. Very advanced for its early date-1886, so perhaps anticipating the Admiralty Wilson Cutter-one wonders if it even anticipated the French Scissor type, with cartridges firing bullets at the Scissor jaws, so as to increase the cutting force. Like you, I wonder why the Admiralty felt it to be inferior to their Pioneer-"Not invented here" syndrome, or perhaps because it did occupy quite a portion of the warhead, reducing explosive, and spacing the concussion away from the side of the hull of the target vessel. I wonder what approach the Germans used-I think the Japanese may have invented the Scissor Cutter, but I may well be wrong! Did you get my e-mail regarding the OCR pdf?

 

 
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