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  1. #1
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    WW2 US .30 ammo can, need info

    I have this WW2 ammo can with a strange long latch on the side. Internet sources that I find can only say it is WW2. Why the strange long locking tab? The other side has "Reeves" with the ordnance bomb symbol. Most boxes I have seen do not have the extra long locking tab. See pics.image.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpg

  2. #2
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    probably added by someone to make the box lockable,you certainly wouldn't have an ammo can with a lock on it.just imagine at the firing point,"whos got the key for the ammo box!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwieod View Post
    probably added by someone to make the box lockable,you certainly wouldn't have an ammo can with a lock on it.just imagine at the firing point,"whos got the key for the ammo box!"
    No, I have seen many others with the same long tab with a slot in it ( which is why I am posting this). See the picture below I copied from the web. That said, mine has an " L" shaped tab with hole riveted on the box which passes thru the slot on the long tab enabling it to be locked- that tab I believe was added onto mine. All the other examples I have seen also have a slot in the long tab but w/o the locking tab. I just saw a dozen of these cans (pictured ) on a half track at this weekends MVPA show.
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    Here is another WW2 box, with latch for mounting directly on the 1917 tripod. Seems there are many types, but no website can explain all the differences. This Brit explains alittle. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-QqpF5gxkDIimage.jpegNo wonder WW2 boxes are becoming collectible.
    Last edited by 917601; 24th April 2018 at 10:41 PM.

  5. #5
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    This weeks CAF show, for interest.
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    Last edited by 917601; 24th April 2018 at 10:48 PM.

  6. #6
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    We have about 2 dozen of these WWII cans that we display on our halftrack (along with 10 .50 cal cans). I am by no means an expert on .30 cal. cans, but I have some pictures attached of our cans and some observations below.

    So all of our cans have the long latch with the slot. None have a tab that sticks through the slot, so I would definitely say that was added. I have multiple boxes produced by Reeves, Canco, Crown and one that is unmarked. The main difference between the manufacturers lies in the hinge construction and how it is attached to the can (rivets vs. spot welding). Crown produced cans are also a little simpler in the stamping.

    Also there are three types of the metal .30 cal cans produced during WWII (as far as I know); the T4 Ammunition Chest, M1 Ammunition Box and the M1A1 Ammunition Box. The T4 was the first to be developed and was designed to be used in tanks and other armored vehicles, usually these are painted in white or red-oxide primer. This box had two latches on either side that rotate to lock the lid on. After some redesigning, we have the M1 Ammunition Box which was the standard used during the war (the majority of my cans and your can pictured). Further refinements led to the M1A1, the big difference being the latch on the side for use with the M1917A1 cradle as well as a new hinge, lid and latch design. These were produced late in the war (around March 1945 if I recall). I have a few photos attached of the three cans side-by-side, I can of course take more/better pictures if you need.

    Hope this gives you a little help! As I mentioned, I am no expert just sharing the little bit I know. If anyone has any better info, please feel free to add and/or correct me.

    Ty
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    Last edited by TX5036; 25th April 2018 at 05:16 AM.

  7. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to TX5036 For This Useful Post:

    917601 (25th April 2018), doppz92 (26th April 2018), Lostround (25th April 2018), reccetrooper (25th April 2018)

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX5036 View Post
    We have about 2 dozen of these WWII cans that we display on our halftrack (along with 10 .50 cal cans). I am by no means an expert on .30 cal. cans, but I have some pictures attached of our cans and some observations below.

    So all of our cans have the long latch with the slot. None have a tab that sticks through the slot, so I would definitely say that was added. I have multiple boxes produced by Reeves, Canco, Crown and one that is unmarked. The main difference between the manufacturers lies in the hinge construction and how it is attached to the can (rivets vs. spot welding). Crown produced cans are also a little simpler in the stamping.

    Also there are three types of the metal .30 cal cans produced during WWII (as far as I know); the T4 Ammunition Chest, M1 Ammunition Box and the M1A1 Ammunition Box. The T4 was the first to be developed and was designed to be used in tanks and other armored vehicles, usually these are painted in white or red-oxide primer. This box had two latches on either side that rotate to lock the lid on. After some redesigning, we have the M1 Ammunition Box which was the standard used during the war (the majority of my cans and your can pictured). Further refinements led to the M1A1, the big difference being the latch on the side for use with the M1917A1 cradle as well as a new hinge, lid and latch design. These were produced late in the war (around March 1945 if I recall). I have a few photos attached of the three cans side-by-side, I can of course take more/better pictures if you need.

    Hope this gives you a little help! As I mentioned, I am no expert just sharing the little bit I know. If anyone has any better info, please feel free to add and/or correct me.

    Ty
    Thanks for taking the time posting pics and the differences. It will help when displaying ammo, the 1917 can could be displayed with metal linked ammo ( with 1945 head stamped cartridges) and the long tab with cloth belted ammo with 1942/43 stamped cartridges.Correct?

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    http://browningmgs.com/AmmoCans/Steel.htm
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    Last edited by bdgreen; 26th April 2018 at 05:27 AM.

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