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  1. #11
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    Now the work continues again on the lathe to turn the pinion to it's final size:



    I made three of the pinions because the first two were 0,2 mm to long and jammed between the upper and lower plate of the clockwork. The third had the right length so i just needed to rivet the brass gear onto the pinion and it was finished.

    Some pictures:

    On the left side the original broken pinion, on the right side one of the two to long prototypes (for size comparsion on a one Cent coin):


    The complete assembled pinion with a replacement brass gear:




    to be continued...
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    Last edited by Alpini; 20th May 2018 at 11:51 PM.

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  3. #12
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    Now I thought that I was ready for the final assembly of the clockwork but during assembly one half of the long straight spring of the following part broke:



    The spring meassured ~25 x 0.6 x 0.07 mm and I had absolutely no idea where to get such a part. But then I remembered that the later clockwork (well known from Zt.Z.S/30 fuzes) has a spring like this and I had one damaged S/30 clockwork which contained such a spring (but undamaged). So I carefully disassembled this clockwork and removed the spring. Kindly this spring has exactly the same dimensions like that one in the Dopp.Z.08 clockwork so I could repair this part too. Originally this spring was fixed with a very small 0.3 x 0.5 mm bolt. The new spring I glued in with 2K epoxy glue because I had no idea how to insert such a small bolt.

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    Last edited by Alpini; 25th May 2018 at 07:44 PM.

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  5. #13
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    now the final assembly of the clockwork was a final assembly:



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    Andysarmoury (26th May 2018), bdgreen (25th May 2018), DICKAREN (26th May 2018), nachtwuenscher (26th May 2018), silent knight (28th May 2018), Snufkin (28th May 2018), thekees (8th June 2018), TimG (25th May 2018), wichitaslumlord (27th May 2018)

  7. #14
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    The nex small missing part was the "window" of the fuze. Originally it was made of very thin celluloid. This material is not easy to get today. Fortunately a friend had some old celluloid coating removed from old furniture. But this celluloid was red colored and to thick (1 mm). The original celluloid windows sometimes had a slightly red tone and others I have seen on photos were clear.

    So I dissolved a small part of the celluloid plate in acetone which then becomes a lacquer and spread it on a glass plate. After 15 min I could remove it from the glass plate with a razor blade (it's like a plastic foil but a litte less flexible).

    To cut out a round disc I made a small punching iron on the lathe. This was working well and gave a perfectly round disc. Just the color was to much red in my opinion:



    On the edges of my friend's celluloid plate there were very small areas without the red Color so I made a second try and dissolved these parts (don't have pictures) and produced a clear window.

    This better colored windows I glued with hide glue (it's a natural product) into the fuze. Normal glues with solvents cannot be used on thin celluloid. To secure the window I made a small aluminium ring like it was done originally. It is inserted as a press-fit.



    The window inserted into the fuze body:



    to be continued...
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    Last edited by Alpini; 28th May 2018 at 12:52 AM.

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    Andysarmoury (28th May 2018), Big Dave (28th May 2018), DICKAREN (28th May 2018), Jb4046 (28th May 2018), nachtwuenscher (28th May 2018), silent knight (28th May 2018), Snufkin (28th May 2018), thekees (8th June 2018), TimG (28th May 2018), tnor_fr (28th May 2018)

  9. #15
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    A last small work was to turn some missing small screws on my lathe. Because all screws Ave imperial pitches (non-metric) I had no screws available which I could alter so I needed to turn them completely from small steel rods. I don't understand why but the screws had unified threads and as far as I know the unified thread standard was established a long time after 1908.

    Turning is a simple task so I did not take any pictures other than from the finished screws:



    As the last step I painted the fuze with shellac which I dissolved in methylated spirits. In factory they were also painted with a special shellac mixture to prevent corrosion.

    The result:



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    Last edited by Alpini; 8th June 2018 at 08:15 PM.

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  11. #16
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    To show you how the fuze clockwork is operating I made a small video. I hope it is running well:

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1uy4...7wRp2CNLn/view

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  13. #17
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    Alpini,
    You have the patience of a saint. What a pleasure it has been to follow your restoration. If others had your skills nothing would be impossible. What is your next project ???
    Cheers
    Hangarman

  14. #18
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    Love the video, hope your timer didn't break again ...

  15. #19
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    Thank you for your response, nice to hear that the video is working. The timer won't break again. It is designed to survive to be fired from a gun.

    Patience is a good word. I had several times during this project were I could start crying :-) I don't think such work requires a lot of skills in the form of prestidigitation and I don't have an apprenticeship in metalworking. But it requires a strong intention and the ability of improvisation because I don't have the technical possibilities which the Krupp factory had. I guess they had ~20 machines running to build the parts for which I could use only two machines.

    Repairing things is the best way to understand how they work in detail.

    Next project is not planned but I did compareable complicated repairs before. But due to the very small size of the parts it was my most complicated project.

    My intention is to only rebuild parts of ordnance which are almost impossible to find as originals. I don't like to rebuild complete projectiles or fuzes for example.

    Maybe this project is an incentive for other members to try some good restoration projects which they wouldn't have tried without my thread
    Last edited by Alpini; 8th June 2018 at 08:57 PM.

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