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  1. #11
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    As early as January 1914 the Defenseur Company, Copenhagen submitted, through their UK agent (MacKnight), a pamphlet and drawings of Aasen pattern grenades offering trials at the company's expense.

    Trials were approved in March 1914 but the Director of Artillery postponed the trials on 9th September 1914 (presumably because his attention was diverted).

    As far as I have been able to ascertain the UK only acquired for trials the Excelsior 'B' grenade and its 'cannon'. 100 inert grenades and one cannon were ordered on the 20th March 1915 through WA MacKnight. The grenades cost 7 shillings each and the cannon 14 pounds (Contract Paper No 75/3/2526.
    N.


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  3. #12
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    Thanks Norman, great detail.

    It would seem strange that they would consider testing this grenade apart from the cost aspect. At about 25% of the cost of a No 3, and 50% of the cost of a No 2 it was good value. Perhaps it was the need for a 'cannon' rather like a Grenatenwerfer that put them off. As you say in September 1914 there were plenty of other distractions.

    John
    William Mills - Thank you!

  4. #13
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    Hi John,
    I think, that these purchasing decisions were and still today are, political. England and Germany also, did not buy any foreign patented munitions, but only introduced into service those, that were invented and could be produced incountry. I think that also purchasing anything from a private foreign factory, you have to pay cash straight away. Producing at home you don't need to do that. Buying munitions in wartime often are not buisinessman but political decisions.
    Greetings,
    Bellifortis.

  5. #14
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    Politics may be one factor but there are many others. It is possible to build under license with a royalty being paid to the inventor. Also many good grenades were rejected after extensive testing such as the No 30 and the Daniels & Gardiner Allways grenades which were both tested in their thousands.

    Also the Germans were not afraid to steal ideas. The M1913 was based entirely upon Hale's patent designs.

    Here's a photo that may be of interest. Left to Right - 1) Standard M1913 2) Cutaway M1913. 3) Pre production M1913 prototype (mock up) in a UK collection.

    M1913_various.jpg

    John
    William Mills - Thank you!

 

 
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