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  1. #1
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    Flare Trip Wire MK1

    I picked up the remains of one today, I guess the top which blows off.
    The good bit is the remaining metal tag which I guess somebody might need.
    Get in touch if you do. I can use the split pin and metal tag for the 11 1/2 or 10
    pound white practice bomb if any one has one.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Just a bump - Does any one need the metal tag and pin for one of these,
    it is dated 8/43

  3. #3
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    It has been taken, to a good home indeed.

  4. #4
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    This is the bottom and the hole in the middle is where the striker comes through. The shape of the top of the striker is very like the mushroom head on the early Grenade No 5 striker, which comes through a keyhole in a metal plate. The end of this plate has a larger hole which fits over the projecting stud on the right of your photo. The plate can then pivot around the stud when the tripwire is pulled, allowing the spring loaded striker to pass through the large part of the keyhole, into the igniter.
    This flare has been broken by means other than correct operation otherwise the pin would not be present. The bakelite body does not break up during operation because it would burn out very quickly and not achieve the desired burn time of about 40 seconds for this mark. A closing cap blows off under gas pressure from the burning flare.
    This mark was quickly replaced when the enemy pioneers realised that the design allowed the tripwire to be cut anywhere along its length, for the flare to become inoperative.
    It was quickly replaced by a Mk 2 version with a more complex mechanism, which burned for 60 seconds and operated when pulled or cut. This was very difficult to set up and unless you knew what you were doing it went off during set up.
    This was replaced by Mk2/1 which stayed in service for many years, into the 1970s at least, had a slightly easier mechanism and a burn time of 80 seconds.
    The flare pots stayed the same but in each case the flare composition was improved.

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to AE501 For This Useful Post:

    AMMOTECHXT (17th June 2018), Gspragge (6th June 2018), ron3350 (6th June 2018), switch (7th June 2018)

 

 

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