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Thread: Gun Cotton Tube

  1. #1
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    Gun Cotton Tube

    I also picked this up, not seen one before, to bad the label
    was in poor shape but at least enough was left to make out
    what this is. Marked the same on both ends, 13" long, 1 1/2"
    diameter.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Gspragge For This Useful Post:

    AE501 (4th June 2018), Andysarmoury (3rd June 2018), Ivashkin (2nd June 2018), Weasel (2nd June 2018)

  3. #2
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    I was still using these on demolitions into the late 1950s but they were being replaced by the Primer CE 1 oz.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to AE501 For This Useful Post:

    Gspragge (4th June 2018)

  5. #3
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    There were 12 primers per inner container (your tube) and 6 x 12 primers per wooden outer container. The six inner containers were held in place by a series of wooden packing fitments that slotted into pre-cut grooves in the outer container, at two points either side in the length of the box. The lid of the outer container was secured with brass screws and sealed with shellac labels. The metal tube such as yours was also the same for the 1 oz CE primer that AE 501 refers to. If my memory is correct 1 oz primers were entirely done away with in the 1980s, although we were still using them (CE primers) at training and operationally in the early 1980s, certainly in 1982. The central hole in the primer was suitable for use with the No 27 (igniferous) and 33 (electric) detonators but first had to be `rectified', using a tool known as a rectifier, to make the hole large enough against the wax used for waterproofing. A lot of primers and 1 lb CE/TNT demolition blocks, all dating from the mid 1940s, were disposed of in bulk demolitions in `Exercise Elbow Room' in 1980.
    Any live or dug ordnance shown in my posts has been dealt with accordingly by eod personel

 

 

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