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  1. #11
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    I never knew that Sir Samuel Curran and William Butement were American!

    Hazord, shame on you.

    Granted, Merle Tuve and his team developed and perfected the proximity fuze but the cavity magnetron together with Curran and Butement were products of the British Empire.

    It should also be pointed out that in 1944, Curran went to the States to participate in the Manhattan Project.

    TimG

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimG View Post
    I never knew that Sir Samuel Curran and William Butement were American!

    Hazord, shame on you.

    Granted, Merle Tuve and his team developed and perfected the proximity fuze but the cavity magnetron together with Curran and Butement were products of the British Empire.

    It should also be pointed out that in 1944, Curran went to the States to participate in the Manhattan Project.

    TimG
    Baldwin's "Deadly Fuze" is regarded as a 'must have' for students of the development of the proximity fuze but Baldwin was hampered in his efforts to extract information from British official sources on UK developments. A very good paper on the British work was written by Professor R W Burns 'Early History of the Proximity Fuze (1937-1940) published in IEE Proceedings-A, Volume 140 No 3 May 1993. Burns comments on the difficulty that Baldwin had in seeking British information:

    "Only one book has been published on the proximity fuze, namely, 'The deadly fuze, secret weapon of World War II' (Jane's Publishing Company, 1980) by Dr. R.B. Baldwin. His book is primarily concerned with the realisation of radio proximity fuzes and deals principally with US advances. He endeavoured in 1977 to elucidate British efforts in the field of proximity fuzes but found from his searches in the Public Record Office that the information made available to him 'was too sparse to use'. A year later he received some papers relating to the British programme and used them to form the basis of a short chapter. However, this he considers in a very fragmentary and non-technical way some progress from 1940, and earlier work is not described.
    The proximity fuze was a British invention and dates from 1936/37. It was devised as an aid in 'bombing the bomber'. No paper or other publication appears to have been written on the early history of the fuze. This paper has as its objectives the early history of the origin, development, potential applications and limitations of some British proximity fuzes (principally the photoelectric proximity fuze), and of their subsequent replacement by the radio proximity fuze. It is mainly based on unpub*lished, primary source material held at the Public Record Office, Kew, United Kingdom."


    Burns goes on to say:


    "On the 30th October 1939 the RDF Application Committee considered a proposal from W.A.S. Butement for a guided projectile in which a form of radio proximity fuze would be used. Butement was a member of ADEE where, from 1936, the acoustic PF had been under development. He was asked by the Director of Scientific Research to examine the idea of a radio PF in more detail. Subsequently, at a meeting of the committee held on the 7th May 1940, two possible methods of employing RDF methods to operate a fuze in a 3 inch UP were advanced by Butement."

    None of this alters the fact that the British did not have the resources to complete the development of the radio proximity fuze or to manufacture it in the numbers that would be required. So, the work thus far done, was gifted to the US by Tizard.
    Last edited by Bonnex; 16th June 2018 at 12:44 PM.
    N.


  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bonnex For This Useful Post:

    AE501 (16th June 2018), TimG (16th June 2018)

 

 
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