Welcome to the Inert Ordnance Collectors.
Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 66
  1. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    new zealand
    Posts
    374
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 221 Times in 98 Posts
    what were you doing with the projectiles(in the second photo) in the middle of the desert?

  2. #42
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    4,200
    Thanks
    500
    Thanked 1,056 Times in 617 Posts
    That photo is one that I found on the internet. I'm guessing it was taken at Yuma Proving Ground. They do lot acceptance testing and long term storage testing for the ammunition. They have a ground mounted 16 inch rifle there. By the way the projos are standing adjacent to each other it looks like a sympathetic detonation test. They would detonate the submunition projo to see if it will detonate the other two.
    Last edited by HAZORD; 14th September 2018 at 10:40 AM.
    ___HAZ/
    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
    ________Saving Lives Through Education

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to HAZORD For This Useful Post:

    Lostround (14th September 2018)

  4. #43
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    52
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    I don't recall seeing a photo that shows which fuze is under the fuze cap of 917601's projectile. As Hazord indicated yesterday, the fuze adapter for the submunition projectile is different from that of the high explosive projectile. The main difference is that the submunition adapter is threaded for a 2"-12 tpi fuze and the HE adapter is threaded for a 1.700"-14 tpi fuze. Perhaps 917601 can show or tell us what's underneath his fuze cap/protector.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Lostround For This Useful Post:

    917601 (14th September 2018)

  6. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    419
    Thanks
    310
    Thanked 143 Times in 85 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Lostround View Post
    I don't recall seeing a photo that shows which fuze is under the fuze cap of 917601's projectile. As Hazord indicated yesterday, the fuze adapter for the submunition projectile is different from that of the high explosive projectile. The main difference is that the submunition adapter is threaded for a 2"-12 tpi fuze and the HE adapter is threaded for a 1.700"-14 tpi fuze. Perhaps 917601 can show or tell us what's underneath his fuze cap/protector.
    What I have, ( the previous owner said the thought fuze was not correct). The adapter is aluminum ( a reproduction I assumed) and the fuze that threads into the adapter is 2 and 5/16th inch OD. The fuze that screws into the adapter is marked , Fuze, MK 71, Mod 15. On to the base - threading is only 1/2" deep threading. No evidence of any shear pins ( internet examples) that would hold the absent base plate. I pulled a few internet diagrams up and noticed the flat spot and channeling as in my example, definitely designed for a " pusher plate", but no shear pins, only 2 channels and 4 threads 1/2 " deep. Any ideas as to the MK number? If identified exactly, I would consider doing a repaint ( with the correct Fed Standard colors) no small job. My thanks for your continued replies.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 917601; 15th September 2018 at 12:02 AM.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to 917601 For This Useful Post:

    apfsds (10th November 2018)

  8. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    419
    Thanks
    310
    Thanked 143 Times in 85 Posts
    Bingo, I spent time running numbers. I believe to have identified this positively. NSN 1320-01-328-1954, D875, Mk 146, Mod 2. The Number " 53711" on the driving band is the cage code. Internet search pulls up a 16"", D875 Mod 2, threaded base, payload 666 M46 grenades. See supporting evidence, now I need a picture of the color scheme, lettering.... a few M46 grenades, and an M724 fuze....many thanks for discovering it is not an ordinary HE, but an ICM ( never thought twice about the interior channeling).
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 917601; 15th September 2018 at 01:25 AM.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to 917601 For This Useful Post:

    apfsds (10th November 2018)

  10. #46
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    4,200
    Thanks
    500
    Thanked 1,056 Times in 617 Posts
    917601 had posted photos of the fuze in this tread:http://www.bocn.co.uk/vbforum/thread...-1700-lb-projo

    These photos, in which the fuze looks like a proximity version.

    The first submunition projectiles were reworked HE projectiles. Those used a fuze adaptor ring that would screw into your existing aluminum adaptor, and accept a 2 inch 12TPI Army fuze. You just need to get one of those or make one.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    ___HAZ/
    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
    ________Saving Lives Through Education

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to HAZORD For This Useful Post:

    apfsds (10th November 2018), Lostround (15th September 2018)

  12. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    new zealand
    Posts
    374
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 221 Times in 98 Posts
    yes I figured those projectiles were ready for some sort of test,seeing as they are miles from anywhere and look wired up

  13. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    419
    Thanks
    310
    Thanked 143 Times in 85 Posts
    I have located some M46 sub munitions and plan to fill the open base with them for display. Question I have is how were they stacked inside? Ribbon aft, or base aft? I can find little information on the stacking. It is a 16"/50 ICM Mark 146 Mod 2. See pics. Any detailed information appreciated.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to 917601 For This Useful Post:

    apfsds (10th November 2018)

  15. #49
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    4,200
    Thanks
    500
    Thanked 1,056 Times in 617 Posts
    The ribbons go toward the bottom, and you need some hollow pipe/tube pieces to protect the bottom grenade ribbons. There is a size of pipe/tube that you can buy that has the same outer diameter as the grenades.

    I have attached photos of D J Harms (Pzgr 40) excellent and extremely labor intensive sectioned 155mm and 8 inch rounds which might be shown here on BOCN, but are also shown on the WK2 Ammo site. The bottom section shows the hollow spacers. The bottom view shows how the spacers and keys are located, but the outer spacers need to match the inside diameter curvature of the specific projectile, 105mm, 155mm, 8 inch or 16 inch.
    Last edited by HAZORD; 23rd September 2018 at 01:02 AM.
    ___HAZ/
    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
    ________Saving Lives Through Education

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to HAZORD For This Useful Post:

    917601 (23rd September 2018), apfsds (10th November 2018)

  17. #50
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    U.S.
    Posts
    4,200
    Thanks
    500
    Thanked 1,056 Times in 617 Posts
    To make some spacers from scratch, I would measure the inside diameter of the projectile body and then get onto a CAD system, using circles the diameter of the grenades, locate them in the big circle of the ID to figure out the configuration of one layer of grenades. Once you do that, you have a choice of using a 3D printer to make spacers, or get a thick sheet of milky white plastic, and mill the holes for the grenades into it. Then just use a band saw to cut the triangle shaped (or whatever geometry) pieces into spacers. 3D printing is slow and expensive, whereas the milling would be fairly fast and cheaper. When you model the grenade diameters add 0.010 or so for tolerance or make the milled holes a touch larger. If you dimension the centers in X and Y of each circle, a manual mill with digital readouts in X and Y would work great.
    ___HAZ/
    _____/ORD Hazardous Ordnance Recognition
    ________Saving Lives Through Education

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to HAZORD For This Useful Post:

    917601 (23rd September 2018)

 

 
Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top