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  1. #11
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    Hello
    I do not have the exact history of this bomb. But they were two sister bombs at the entrance of a depot of air force in the Marne near Reims.
    This depot was used by the Germans, who even blew up two
    alveoles storage before their debacle.
    It is possible that they were put in place by the Germans, as it is possible that they were the
    he French they set up after the war. Still, at the closure of the depot, the Civil Security and took one and the other armies.
    That's what I can say about this bomb.
    Friendship


    COMPOS SUI ------------ Master of one's self in all circumstances

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tarbelin51 For This Useful Post:

    skull181 (24th October 2018), Yodamaster (22nd October 2018)

  3. #12
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    Eric did you get the other info?

    Regards,

    Chris
    All Items of Live Ordnance posted by me have been disposed of by EOD.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yodamaster View Post
    Apparently, all three are sky blue, only SC1800 (II) should have two yellow circumferential bands 3in width


    Yoda
    Strange the document Chris presented says RAL 7028 (beigegrau).

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by greif View Post
    Strange the document Chris presented says RAL 7028 (beigegrau).
    It's not strange, as pale blue was a colour used for tropical bombs prior to July 1942 and apparently this colour scheme could be pretty common in Europe too.
    STRANGE is, other German manuals, e.g. of the D.(Luft) 4300 series, identify the beige colour as the Beigegrau RAL 7027.

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  7. #15
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    Being the lump it is i suspect it was painted this blue to match the underneath of German Bombers so it didn't stick out like a sore thumb especially if it was painted a dark green or black when observing at distance that the aircraft bombing had a giant pay load and would have been picked out as a target by AA guns or fighter aircraft.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMG50 View Post
    Being the lump it is i suspect it was painted this blue to match the underneath of German Bombers so it didn't stick out like a sore thumb especially if it was painted a dark green or black when observing at distance that the aircraft bombing had a giant pay load and would have been picked out as a target by AA guns or fighter aircraft.
    That's why I suspect, tropical blue scheme was fairly popular for bigger bombs in Europe. Official colour for normal climate bombs before July 1942 was dark gray RAL 7021.

  9. #17
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    May I suggest another hyothesis?
    The Light Blue paint, Dark green, Black and Red, were classical paints for metal parts and machinery (locomotives, heavy engines and such) in Europe from the thirties to the mid-fifties, widely available. the Soviet for instance used quite regularly locomotive paints on their bombs, as they seem to always have had problems of availability of regulation paints.
    The issue of camouflage of bombs under the fuselage of a bomber is much less relevant that the camouflage of these bombs on ground stakes, which benefit from dark colors (dark green/ grey-black) in Europe, except during the snowy winter months, when light blue would be a very good alternative to white, which anyway was more available as wash rather than a real metal paint.
    Photo evidence shows that it was a regular policy in the RAF from 1940 onwards to spray the the bomb sacks in dark green, to camouflage them, leaving the bombs half yellow half green.
    The US Navy initiated from the beginning of the war in the Pacific, an unoffical spraying of the bombs (Yellow, which was the colour of high explosive bombs in the US, UK, France, Nederlands etc.. in the thirties) with what was available on board the ship for camouflage repairs - navy light grey, a practice that became official only in late 1943.
    The Beige-Grey paint would obviously have fulfiled the same aim for the Germans in North Africa, while less easily available.
    I do think that regulations on such matters often conflicted with the reality of the war such as availability of supplies and deployment of air units to widely distant areas with different weather conditions.

  10. #18
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    Hallo,
    I only have the L.Dv.4200 dt.1942 to go on. There is some more info in D.Luft 4300, Teil 1, Heft 5, which I do not have. Has anyone a digital copy ? The SC 1800 was 3500mm long. There were 2 filling classes. Filling 13 = 1000kg FP 60/40 and Filling 105 = 1100 kg Trialen. So, the Trialen filled bomb was 100kg more heavy than its brother filled with FP 13. They were fuzed with the ELAZ (25)D. The basecolour on the bombs was "beigegray". The Trialen filled bombs were to be used only against merchantships. They had the silhouette of a merchantman painted on all 4 sides on the cone of the tail-unit. On the body was painted "C1800 Trialen" and left and right of this, parallel to the bombachsis "Nur gegen Handelsschiffe". The FP 60/40 filled bombs had 4 yellow stripes painted equidistant on the cone of the tail-unit. You should check D.Luft 4300, Teil1, Heft 5 for any additional info. Your bomb has no "Kopfring", so it was ment for landuse and needs the yellow stripes on the cone of the tail-unit.
    Bellifortis.
    Last edited by Bellifortis; 23rd October 2018 at 07:06 PM.

  11. #19
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    Four longitudinal yellow stripes on the tail cone were standard marking of a SC class bomb, introduced around 1940-1941. SB bombs apparently had initially the same marking, later changed to four pairs of yellow stripes. Trialen bombs had these stripes replaced with yellow ships, four on SC bombs and eight on SB bombs.

  12. #20
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    Hello
    The blue color of the bomb, it is we who made the choice of this color.
    When we got the bomb, there was a lot of blue and a little gray.
    COMPOS SUI ------------ Master of one's self in all circumstances

 

 
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