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  1. #1
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    Torpedo propulsion RGF 14 inch Mk X

    Anybody got information about a 14 inch mk X RGF torpedo. I am wondering if the most of the depth keeping mechanism (secret chamber) of this torpedo was placed in front of the three cycle Brotherhood engine, but with in the engine chamber. Or was there a system for waterpressure measuring placed on the other side of the wall between engine and airflask. And how did this look like.
    And was there a gyroscope mounted or upgraded in all of these. All info is welcome!
    DCABEAEA-6791-4824-AD0C-33EED8492E63.jpg 9B70B678-6266-486C-8F3F-70D56737F904.jpg D90C4BDA-1987-49DD-B1BD-5B2D7433CF26.jpg B73AE25A-FEDE-41AA-8B7E-DAB7C7FD2E85.jpgB73AE25A-FEDE-41AA-8B7E-DAB7C7FD2E85.jpg

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    apfsds (16th December 2018)

  3. #2
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    Nobody any info?

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    Super nice restoration.

    Most of the torpedo depth control devices that I have seen in various countries torpedoes were housed next to the guidance gyro or mounted to the gyro housings. Many of the early depth controls were pendulum designs and did not require contact with water or pressure. Later designs were more advanced. Wish I could better specifically answer your questions better.

    Jason

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    Michel (16th December 2018)

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    Thank you Jason, a lot of time went in to cleaning this one. I was hoping for a source not know to me for a blueprint of somekind. But probably it is lost forever. The model was used from 1898 and at the end of ww1 there were 50 kept in reserve the rest was destroyed.
    The photo of the mk IX is the same but some technical issues were resolved in the X model (weak tail section).The first succesfull torpedo attack by plane was also a 14 inch model X type torpedo.
    93A6F03B-3FCD-4897-B45C-2619E7F25FD7.jpeg

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    apfsds (16th December 2018)

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    Seriously, SUPER IMPRESSIVE! I'll try to hunt down info too for you if I can :-)


    Jason

  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michel View Post
    Anybody got information about a 14 inch mk X RGF torpedo. I am wondering if the most of the depth keeping mechanism (secret chamber) of this torpedo was placed in front of the three cycle Brotherhood engine, but with in the engine chamber. Or was there a system for waterpressure measuring placed on the other side of the wall between engine and airflask. And how did this look like.
    And was there a gyroscope mounted or upgraded in all of these. All info is welcome!
    Hi Michel,

    the depth regulator compartment was in front of the engine compartment, I don’t know that much on RGF’s production so I’m unsure which kind of pendulum it was.
    Looking at the picture of the front side is visible the waterproof chamber which is the component meant to transmit the depth regulator’s movement to the air assisted servo, on the right side the piping leading to the air loading and conservation valves.
    Between the depth regulator and the machine compartments there was a wet space, at its fore there was the back of the hydrostatic rubber disk, which sensing the water pressure interacted with the pendulum’s spring system, at its back what you see in the front picture.
    The inside picture shows the air assisted servo (cylinder on the right) and its blocking devices, that servo sends the depth regulator’s output straight to the horizontal rudders by mean of a a rod passing trough the oblique fat pipe visible in the overall picture, the thin rod that runs parallel to the engine shaft connects the guidance system to the vertical rudders for direction keeping, the guidance system with its gyro device, likely of the Weymouth type, was installed right behind the engine compartment.

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Lefa. For This Useful Post:

    Michel (17th December 2018), Sprockets (14th January 2019)

  11. #7
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    Hi Lefa, I had to read it twice to take it in. But your explanation is very good thank you for taking the trouble to write it down! I have seen different types of pendulum in Rijkea but non like the one that is going to fit on this system. The rod (running parallel to the axel) I suspected was the one connected to the gyro. And I know that the Weymouth type gyro worked well with the Mk X when it was installed in one. Hopefully a blueprint surfaces in the years to come. Thanks for your input.
    Last edited by Michel; 17th December 2018 at 03:36 PM.

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    You’re welcome, unfortunately I don’t have drawings of the Mk-X in the archive, the components are more or less the ones of the other contemporary projects but for each project there are often minor changes and different fittings. I’m not aware of any Mk-X out for display, there is a Mk-IX in Canada somewhere by memory, for drawings I’d dig at the National Archives.
    Most likely the pendulum was the one from 1883 as attached, but its actual micro-fitting can’t be assumed.
    For instance, many torpedoes of that period had the depth regulator compartment right in front of the engine one, but your sample has the waterproof chamber with its lever pointing forward, so assuming that the front bulkhead of the engine compartment is solid metal and doesn’t has the hydrostatic rubber disk (?), this project had a wet chamber between the depth regulator and the engine compartment.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    apfsds (18th December 2018), doppz92 (18th December 2018), Michel (18th December 2018)

  14. #9
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    Amazing reference photos and diagrams, Lefa! Thank you. I saved all of the images. Loved seeing the cross section showing the gyro, engine and depth control apparatus. I have the gyro in my collection :-)

    Jason

  15. #10
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    Hi Lefa, indeed the setup with this one was somewhat different but along the same way. The front bulkhead is solid metal. I dug up these photos and on the second we can see a watertight bulkhead crossing somewhat the same as the Mk X. Would be nice to have a Weymouth gyro to go with the engine. I go and save up for one. Thanks!
    5D4CE506-66ED-4D5D-9004-7A17E490CB4B.jpg 8EA581D6-13BA-47CC-AF65-532404A4A9B7.jpg

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to Michel For This Useful Post:

    Lefa. (19th December 2018)

 

 

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