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  1. #11
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    If on-line search proves negative, you might try the R E Museum at Chatham, who may, or may not, have the archives for this period. Curatorial staff are most helpful, if they don't hold them they will know a man who does! But be aware that much was weeded out in the MoD. So far as artillery ranges are concerned, the archives are in store but probably available on request, the museum exhibits, Rotunda and then Firepower, are all in storage at present, they hope to have a new museum at Larkhill at some point in the future. Alan1.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2pounder View Post
    max range is achieved at 33deg elevation not 45.
    Is this a typo? or missing qualifying criteria?

    TimG
    Last edited by TimG; 8th January 2019 at 08:48 PM.

  3. #13
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    text book small arms 1929 page 277 halfway down '' It is an observed fact that the greatest range of any hand held gun occurs at an elevation of about 33deg., and not the conventional 45deg....their shot fall nearly vertical at any elevation which approaches or is greater than that angle. Artillery can use higher elevations and get the shell into less dense air to achieve max range...... The terminal velocity of rifle bullets is very low due to air resistance. '' Might be low but still lethal IMHO

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to 2pounder For This Useful Post:

    TimG (8th January 2019)

  5. #14
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    Thank you. That explains a lot. I wonder if at greater elevations, the flight time is sufficient for the spin imparted by rifling to have fallen to a point where it is insufficient to maintain stabilisation causing the bullets to tumble and fall to the ground - "their shot falling vertically"

    TimG

  6. #15
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    The danger area for a regular classification range (coming from the 1952 Infantry Training manual, this will be equivalent to WW2 regulations) was 2000 yards to the rear of the targets, with a width of over 800 yards for eight targets. A field firing range, which may not have a stop butt, has an increased danger area of up to 3000 yards. If LMG, MMG or rifle are firing from moving vehicles and using Mk8z ammunition, the danger area extends to a huge 6,200 yards and a width 1,760 yards. The same manual also notes that 'it is on record that bullets striking the ground 400 yards from the muzzle of the rifle have travelled 1,700 yards'. While 6,200 yards is not the range of Mk8z .303 bullets, it gives the general idea of the area in which a small arms range must be contained.

 

 
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